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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm joining a SAA affiliated club, but they don't do their training until the winter months, with the first open water dives in spring of the following year.

I'm too impatient to wait for (effectively) another year to pass before getting in the water, so I'm about to book a PADI OW 5 day course plus the PADI drysuit course to run concurrently. Once done I'll crossover to the SAA club and continue training there.

I wondered if I'm better buying the manuals when I book the course to give me 2 weeks to read up and at least have some idea of the content before starting the course?

Anyone have any hints and tips to get the most out of the 5 day course?
 

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NULLI-SECUNDUS
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Hi Dave which SAA club are you joining as a Padi OW you crossover to a SAA Openwater Diver .
An open water diver can only dive under the direct supervision of a dive leader or higher qualified diver/instructor.
An open water diver has limited open water diving experience and must progress to club diver training to gain further skills.

Keep to Padi to Rescue the crossover to SAA Club Diver

Any more info PM me
Thanks
James
 

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PADI Internet Specialty Diver
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...
I wondered if I'm better buying the manuals when I book the course to give me 2 weeks to read up and at least have some idea of the content before starting the course?
...
The manuals are included and should come with the deposit.

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
James,

I understand what you're saying, but it's the SAA club I want to dive with (Arnewood Divers based in Mudeford Quay, Christchurch, Dorset). The PADI OW course is purely to get me an equivalent in the SAA scheme that allows me to dive under the supervision of their Dive Leaders and above.

To me it's more about getting the qualifications and being paired with random buddies at various dive sites - I want to belong to a small, but active and, above all, safe club.

My impatience IS getting the better of me as far as getting the initial qualification is concerned, but I'll be in safe and experienced hands thereafter :)

Chris,
The PADI centre I'm using quote the manual prices separate to the course fees. For example, the OW course is £239 for 5 days, the Drysuit Diver course is halfprice (£50) if run concurrently with the OW course and the manuals an additional £25 (OW manuals) and £11 (drysuit manuals).

Regardless...when I book the courses and pay the deposit I should be able to buy the manuals too :)
 

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NULLI-SECUNDUS
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James,

I understand what you're saying, but it's the SAA club I want to dive with (Arnewood Divers based in Mudeford Quay, Christchurch, Dorset). The PADI OW course is purely to get me an equivalent in the SAA scheme that allows me to dive under the supervision of their Dive Leaders and above.

To me it's more about getting the qualifications and being paired with random buddies at various dive sites - I want to belong to a small, but active and, above all, safe club.

My impatience IS getting the better of me as far as getting the initial qualification is concerned, but I'll be in safe and experienced hands thereafter :)

Chris,
The PADI centre I'm using quote the manual prices separate to the course fees. For example, the OW course is £239 for 5 days, the Drysuit Diver course is halfprice (£50) if run concurrently with the OW course and the manuals an additional £25 (OW manuals) and £11 (drysuit manuals).

Regardless...when I book the courses and pay the deposit I should be able to buy the manuals too :)

Which padi centre are you using
 

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Normally, following the PADI system, you would get the manuals when you pay the deposit for the course. The manuals contain knowledge reviews that you would then complete before the classroom sessions. The answers you give guide the instructor in which areas he should emphasise when delivering the course. Finally, you review any incorrect answers you give and sign to say that you understand it now.

PADI coursewear is probably the best I've seen, it's difficult to see how you could fulfil the PADI course without the manuals to be honest.
 

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The manuals are included and should come with the deposit.

Chris
Chris,

Not always, some centres "add them as extra cost" in order to be able to advertise a "cheaper" course price.

Dodgy tactic to me IMHO, but I can find half a dozen ads straight off who do it.

Sorry to be picky.

.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hmmm...maybe they quote the manual costs separately to keep their course costs lower - don't know...

It sounds like it would be worth buying the manuals when I book and pay the deposit though.

[edit] Heh - you got in there just before me Divingniknaks :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The certification fee isn't listed and they seem to be pretty careful about listing everything else..

£300 (+mask, snorkel, fins and boots) seems to be the expected rate for the OW course, so they're not far below that.

Hmmm...thinking about it I'll look for a cheap pair of boots on ebay, as I'll be shifting to drysuit once out of the pool...
 

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i thought all padi courses included the certification ?

i would be well upset if i had to pay for the bloody pic card as well!! :teeth:
 

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13.05.2012 QPRmageddon Day
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The certification fee isn't listed and they seem to be pretty careful about listing everything else..

£300 (+mask, snorkel, fins and boots) seems to be the expected rate for the OW course, so they're not far below that.

Hmmm...thinking about it I'll look for a cheap pair of boots on ebay, as I'll be shifting to drysuit once out of the pool...
Dave,
Ive apair of boots that you can have de nada as I bought them in a
"frustrated housewives" moment
As for the rest of the stuff, give me a pm and I ll try n sort you out
Lee
 

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PIC card often isn't included, and used as a bump up at the end of the course, while you're sitting about discussing the qualifying dives they then get the pic out and you get all excited and don't realise you've just spent another £15. :)

The course price sounds fair, if you are going to get a drysuit straight after the course then ask them to lend you a pair of boots for the course. As you'll be spending 5 days training with them and spending a fair bit of money with them, it seems reasonable. Especially if you don't have a plan for using them for a while after the course.

If you're getting the manuals separately then go ahead and get them soon, you can be one step ahead of the game. A lot of students on the OW course turn up on day one and then start doing the manual stuff on the evenings between days of the course. Naturally this makes for quite long days :) There are quite a lot of other books out there aimed at OW/AOW divers which you will probably find very interesting, just have a look at what's on the shelves at the dive shop, ask them for reccomendations. Try and avoid any books where people die a lot. Basically if it's about the Andrea Doria, there's going to be a few deaths along the way. Neutral Buoyancy by Tim Ecott is entertaining enough and is usually one that people get through in their first year of diving.

Other stuff worth practicing. Work on your humming. If you humm (it needs to be quite loud) at fish then they will swim towards you, attracted by the vibration. This will amaze the other students, you may not realise your instructor is doing this, and you will look like Johnny on the spot if you can do it too. There's a bit of an art to humming loud enough. Lie int he bath on your back and have just your nose above the water level, then try and humm as loud as you can. Get a friend to tell you how loud you've got, they should be able to hear from outside the bathroom.

Digs.
 

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Chris,

Not always, some centres "add them as extra cost" in order to be able to advertise a "cheaper" course price.

Dodgy tactic to me IMHO, but I can find half a dozen ads straight off who do it.

Sorry to be picky.

.
Hmm... not picky Phil, just pointing out how long it is since I worked in the industry...

Dodgy tactic to me too..

Piss poor from such a well know name as well.

Shame.

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
Size 8 feet - dainty for my height of 6' :embarassed: I wonder how I stay upright sometimes...

I guess there may be a use for a pair in the pool over the winter to practise buoyancy, test new equipment and the like? I could ask the guys at the club these questions, but you're all a captive audience, so I may as well throw my questions at you ;)

Sent you a pm Lee - thanks :)

Digger, useful information there. I'm deeply suspicious of the humming recommendation though...I'll hold back on that until I get a second, third and probably more opinions. I have visions of instructors sitting around their beers afterwards comparing notes on how many student idiots they had humming Rule Britannia at 6 metres...
 

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Don't hum Rule Britannia. The change in tone scares them off again. YOu want to stick to a single note and vary the embachure. Aim for a digeridoo type noise and you won't go far wrong.

Tell the instructors you'd read about the technique on the internet. They may try and deny it (it is a bit of a secret) but that is how it is done. You can't hear other people doing it because of all the bubbles and the thick hoods you'll be wearing. Just try it out, you'll see. Watch a fish which is pointing away from you. Stay very still. Hum at it very loudly. It will turn towards you in a few seconds, and eventually will swim toward you.

I don't know why this happens. It is one of those mysteries of science. Maybe it interferes with their lateral line.

But you are right o be suspicious. I often struggle to convince people of things that they need to do underwater because they feel certain that I am trying to wind them up. But when it comes to diving it is all a very serious business.

On teh costs front I'd rather see up front how much it costs broken down into where it all goes. Seems fair if they advertise it up front. No wool being pulled by the looks of it, just a slightly different way of doing it. Like the Citroen adverts on the telly where they tell you how cheap the basic model is without a steering wheel or any windows, then you go and find out that anything on top of that costs you money.

Digs.
 

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I've just realised that my earlier post could have looked like a dig at the particular store concerned.

It was NOT meant that way, they have clearly broken it down so the prospective customer can see it all up front.

The ones that bug me are the ones where the "extras" are all hidden in small print. These are "extras" that are actually necessary to the course.

That's what upsets me.

Sorry if I unwittingly cast an unfair aspertion (sp) on the Dive Op concerned.

.
 

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Just as small point centres often split the costs of books to avoid having to charge VAT on the whole amount as books are zero rated if sold by themselves. Also that advertising a cheaper price thing. We don't do it here but maybe I should start.

B

PS Digs Don't go giving away trade secrets... that how I impress my students, but southern he is right.
 
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