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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Quick question - not being lazy (I will do some research on Google but you can get lost!)

What happens to an abandoned property - reason I'm asking a local property has been left to rot for ooh at least 10 years. Someone, somewhere must own it - even if they're dead it must have passed into their estate. I thought I heard somewhere that Local Authorities now had the right to take over abandoned property - any truth?
 

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Well, all land ultimately belongs to the Crown and there is no guarantee that the land is even registered at the Land Registry although this is now happening whenever land / properties change ownership.

You got your eye on something Ron? ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well, all land ultimately belongs to the Crown and there is no guarantee that the land is even registered at the Land Registry although this is now happening whenever land / properties change ownership.

You got your eye on something Ron? ;)
Yep - and its a crying shame the way it stands - most probably it would need a massive amount of remedial work and ultimately maybe even need to be partially demolished and rebuilt. With the number of so-called wanna-be "property developers" out there I can't see that it can be that easy to chase down the owner or surely someone would have done something already.

Maybe that's what I picked up about councils - if the crown ultimately own the property I suppose Government bodies can be granted the rights and then local authorities dispose of them. Hmmm
 

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If there is a property standing on the land, you will find it in the Land Registry. Often developers leave beautiful buildings to decay as a ploy to forcing the issue on Planning Consent. This happened with two magnificent houses standing in Park Road opposite the Hanover gate to Regent's Park. They looked abandoned for years. Now the site is a massive block of expensive flats.
On the other hand the building you mention may be subject to probate.
 

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Yep - if someone dies and no one inherits then who gets the land? Owners are granted title on the land, registered with the Land Registry but they do not own the land in perpetuity. It can be passed to heirs (obviously there are IHT potential liabilities) but ultimately, it all belongs to the Crown - thats why each and every square inch of soil is referred to as the United Kingdom. I couldn't declare my property outside of the UK (Passport to Pimlico anyone?).

I'm sure someone can explain the legalese better than me.
 

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If there is a property standing on the land, you will find it in the Land Registry.
Only if it has been registered and not all properties have. They are now all being registered when title changes however there are still a fair percentage of properties in the UK that remain unregistered.
 

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Only if it has been registered and not all properties have. They are now all being registered when title changes however there are still a fair percentage of properties in the UK that remain unregistered.
Jay is 100% correct. I 'found' an abandined house that has not been lived in for 30 odd years. It's in the middle of nowhere so i can't ask the neighbours, because there aren't any!

I contacted the Land Registry and off the top of my head you only have to register the property if it's been sold after something like 1949 ( the date is probably wrong, but it's around that time).

I spoke to a developer mate of mine who told me what he does. He goes down ther usual search routes and if there is no success, he sticks one of his sign boards in the garden saying 'Property Under Development' with his contact details on. If the owner see's it then it doesn't take long for a letter or phone call to come through. Obviously, this may work, but i can see a prospective sale getting off to a bad start this way, but my mates been quite successful. . . .
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
On the other hand the building you mention may be subject to probate.
John, I reckon that's probably more likely - I did follow Hickdive's thread and the pdf made for interesting reading; looked to my non-legal eyes that the squatters law is a bit like "salvour in posession" but you've got to be there for 10 years (if I understood the document correctly)

It looks all very murky and it's probably why the place has remained empty for so long - crying shame.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Jay is 100% correct. I 'found' an abandined house that has not been lived in for 30 odd years. It's in the middle of nowhere so i can't ask the neighbours, because there aren't any!

I contacted the Land Registry and off the top of my head you only have to register the property if it's been sold after something like 1949 ( the date is probably wrong, but it's around that time).
How did you get on with this property?

Thanks for the info stevechesh I've sent you a PM
 

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hmmm.. open circuit revisited...
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I contacted the Land Registry and off the top of my head you only have to register the property if it's been sold after something like 1949 ( the date is probably wrong, but it's around that time).
I think the date is more like 1977... so lots of scope for land not being registered with the LR. You now must register a property if you transfer ownership.

You could contact the property section of the Council to see if the land was ever owned by them or one of the utilities and maybe get a few leads that way. Else parish registers or old electoral roles or census data can be of help tracing a previous owner....

Good Luck
 

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Yep - if someone dies and no one inherits then who gets the land? Owners are granted title on the land, registered with the Land Registry but they do not own the land in perpetuity. It can be passed to heirs (obviously there are IHT potential liabilities) but ultimately, it all belongs to the Crown - thats why each and every square inch of soil is referred to as the United Kingdom. I couldn't declare my property outside of the UK (Passport to Pimlico anyone?).

I'm sure someone can explain the legalese better than me.
Jay is spot on here. The Queen is the world's largest landowner, with holdings including the UK, Canada and Australia!

Freehold is tenure, not ownership.

As far as I know the system goes back to the ages where the monarchy wielded genuine power and used it as a means of control, giving it the ability to grant and retract favours.
 
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