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Discussion Starter #1
Apart from the obvious (more of the suckable stuff) what benefits are there to diving on a twinset.....

Cheers Gary


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Apart from the obvious (more of the suckable stuff) what benefits are there to diving on a twinset.....

Cheers Gary




Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
not only more of the suckable stuff , but also more ways to get at it, save it, and use it ,
ps
can also get you in to trubble as well ,,
 

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Team Starburst
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Twinsets

No need to change cylinders for the second dive

Potentially less wasted gas. If you dive on a single cylinder you will surface with 50-70 bar, you then discard that gas and start a new cylinder. With a twinset you are carrying the unused gas forward to the second dive.

Looks way cooler than a single and pony :)
 

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Dunno really........ thinking about it
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You probably need to ask about the disadvantages too:

Heavy
Expensive
Need more kit
More expensive to clean and test
Are more difficult to dive than people think
You look a bit of a twat on a 10m shore dive
..and the start of the slippery slope to techiedom.
Squeaky gas,
Computers
and lots of time lost in YD well informed discussions :)

They are generally much better to use than the dreaded single and pony which is only one step away from the snorkel.
 

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Good question,
Twinset divers always seem to be first back on the boat, "need to make sure i got enough air for the next dive"
Heavy, cumbersome, expensive.
Unless youre using it with stages to do one, long, deep dive i really dont see the point.
Gimme 2 single 15's anyday.
 

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PADI Internet Specialty Diver
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More failure points.
More training if you want to do manifolded shutdowns.
Pissing about with regulators if you swap twin/single.
Need to run two BCD.

No, the main advantage is more gas. That's about it.
 

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You save money getting twin 12`s filled compared to 2 single 12`s at stony thats all the justification i need and its no more expensive to service than a single and a pony

main benefit imho is redundancy oh and enough air so that if something bad happens you can think well i have enough air to sort this out not oh sh1t im going to run out of air
 

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You save money getting twin 12`s filled compared to 2 single 12`s at stony thats all the justification i need and its no more expensive to service than a single and a pony

main benefit imho is redundancy oh and enough air so that if something bad happens you can think well i have enough air to sort this out not oh sh1t im going to run out of air
thay charge more for 12l lol what a piss take ,, and thay prob pump more gas in to a manifolded set .
 

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Longer no deco dives with Nitrox. At 30m on 34% a single 12 runs out of gas a long time before the NDL.
 

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noo they charge more to fill 2 single 12`s i think its 5.80 for twins and 3.50 for a single 12 but haven't had a single filled for a long time
twins as in manifolded £5.80
or twins as in just a set of bands £7
 

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twins as in manifolded £5.80
or twins as in just a set of bands £7

thanks therefore for every 2 dives i do with a twinset at stony im saving 1.20 just 10 dives and i have saved enough for the visual test on the extra cylinder :D i can finally justify having a twinset
 

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Redundancy, which is one of the pillars of safety engineering. One of your systems can fail completely, and you'll still have another entirely separate one to fall back on. That's why the jet that flies you to Mallorca has more engines/control systems/etc than it needs.

The maths works out as follows (simplified examples, not taking into account the fact that 'failed' regs will usually still give you air etc.) :

If you don't have redundancy (e.g you have one life support system with two components which must both work simultaneously for you to survive) then the probability of system failure is obtained by adding their failure rates, e.g. if both your 1st and 2nd stage regs have a 0.1 chance of failing then the overall chance of your regs not working is 0.2.

If you have two independent systems, only one of which must be working to keep you alive, then the probability of both systems failing is obtained by multiplying the two failure rates. So if you have two complete sets of regs, each with a 0.2 chance of failure, then the probability of total system failure = 0.2 x 0.2 = 0.04. A much better chance of survival.
 
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