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<font color='#FF0000'>Got chatting to a fella at stoney at the weekend and he told me that skin divers kill octopuses by grabbing their legs and biting the little cuties right between the eyes, instantly killing them!! Am I being taken for a right muppet or is thie true?

Oh btw...Channel 5 wednesday...Tanya streeter's record dive...8.30 I think...I know the footie is on but we'll be 3 down by then!!

Cheers
Nige
 

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<font color='#000080'>I have also been told of this method.

Don't know how many Octopod hunters still use this method !!


Daz
 

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See if you find a copy of a book "A pattern of islands". The Gilbert Islanders were reported to work in buddy teams one diver acting as bait the other as jaws.
 

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I've seen mention of the bite between the eyes as a way of killing the poor things;the other way is of course to turn them inside out  
 

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<font color='#0000FF'>Last Sunday morning saw two octopus over 1,5m .no joke! I would not want to try to bit between their eyes - to slimey as well.

As curious side effect from the Prestige oil disaster there has been a fishing ban saw the Octopus have more prey and that themmselves are not being hunted.  Great creatures.. Dis anyone see octopus garden on Anima Planet.  The octopus was placed in an aquarium on the boat, he then slid out and crawed until he fell in back to the ocean.
 

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<font color='#000080'>I know I am going to get flamed for this ..... but that biting works.....I use a diveknife myself when I do take one home for the pot once in a while.
 

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<font color='#000080'>Ahhh Cephalopods...  One of my all time favourites beasties,  I always had a wish list of animals I wanted to see, and they were all various species of Whales, Sharks or Rays and all of them lived upto or exceeded my expectations

But one of my most memorable dives involved finding a Flambouyant cuttlefish unexpectedly.  I spent 40 minutes just watching the little critter flash his colours, feed and wander along.  Awesome  


Sometimes it truly is the little things in life.

Daz
 

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glad to hear I wasn't the only one who read Arthur Grimble's book A Pattern of Islands - slightly turgid but some useful passages also  
 

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<font color='#0000FF'>Cepholopods are great. See them at nearly everydive and always a great pleasure.

Spotted this news item of a colossal squid:Colossal squid

Not sure I would want to see one of these face to face!
 

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<font color='#0000FF'>Shame on you michael,
 cephalopods are cool and octopuses in particular are highly intelligent.

Good call Daz, cuttlefish are one of my favourite sea beasties, I think I once posted here about their method of buoyancy control, very elegant    


Che-az
steve
 

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Bloody scientists, only found out what a lagomorph was yesterday, now you chuck another big word in.

Andrew
 

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<font color='#FF0000'>When the kiddies at school ask me what my fave underwater critter is I always get a strange look from them when I say cuttlefish...I dived with a pair off the ferry port in Malta once and they were flashing and pulsating like a 70's disco...totally cool...and what's their fate? hanging up in a budgie's cage!
Good call Daz...cuttlefish rock!!!
 
 
 

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[b said:
Quote[/b] (Steve W @ April 03 2003,15:23)]octopuses in particular are highly intelligent.
Isn't that a subject of controversy, Steve? I saw a TV programme not long ago – can't remember whether it was Animal Planet, National Geographic or Discovery - that discussed that issue. A woman who has spent some years studying them (I believe she was American) wasn't at all sure that their alleged high intelligence wasn't just a myth, that much of what we interpret as intelligence is in fact just instinctive behaviour.
 

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<font color='#0000FF'>Well our Home Office agrees with the view that they are intelligent as Octopuses are the only invertebrate which you require a Home Office licence to work on (invertebrates comprising at least 97% of all animal species on earth).

As for the American lady , well I don't know  what her scientific standing may be but there's that famous bit of footage where a guy unscrews a jam jar, puts food into it, then gives it to the octopus who promptly unscrews it!

It may be that it suits her personal research purposes to claim it is instinctive behaviour. For instance I know a guy who works on coral bleaching and dreams up "solutions" then sets out to prove his theory is right because he knows "that just has to be the right answer"  
 
 FFS!!

for those who don't realise the signifiance of this, the basic scientific concept is that you "test" your hypotheses in an attemt to disprove them, then if you find a difference between A & B it tends to support your hypothesis and you move onto more tests etc etc

Chee-az
Steve
 

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Steve,
The "long word" you have posted the link to. Isn`t that just the amino acid sequence for a sub unit of TMV? If that is the longest word I am sure between us we could find many more. The protein I work on is 456 residues in length- and that is by no means long!

Paul
 

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I wish I'd paid more attention, Steve! Actually, the lady concerned was of pretty high scientific standing, as I remember it. She did discuss the screw-top jar experiment, as well as various other experiments claimed to show how intelligent octopuses are and, if I remember correctly, had fairly convincing arguments why they cannot be considered to prove anything. I don't think she claimed that octopuses are NOT intelligent, just that their intelligence has probably been overestimated. I believe her conclusion is that, while they are certainly more intelligent than your average invertebrate, they are far less intelligent than many vertebrates that we do not consider particularly intelligent. But, as I say, my memory on all this is rather vague.
 

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<font color='#000080'>Without getting too deep here.  Is this noot based on the human perception of intelligence.

How do we define intelligence ?

As far as I am concerned thay are one of the most fascinating creatures I have had the pleasure to watch.

Also has anyone seen the follow on experiment to the jam jar lid where after working out how to unscrew the lid, it also learnt to unscrew a lid that had a reverse thread just by watching a fellow Octopus in the next tank.

But my all time favourite is the story about a aquarium who decided to stick a pacific giant octopus in a tank with sharks (probably grey nurse sharks).  They were concerned about how long it would survive.  After a week or so they found a dead shark, followed by another not long after.  Guess the culprit.....

Daz
 

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Shame about the sharks, but dont you just love it when that happens.
I'll go along with the cuttlefish brigade, mate sent me a photo and I fell in love with them. And because I've not seen one in UK waters (they arent at Stoney) I cant wait to see one for real. Seems incredible that something so lovely can look so different when in a budgie cage.
Matt
 

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I love octopuses and cuttlefish too, even the tiny cuttlefish (Sepiola atlantica) we have in the UK and Scandinavia. They never cease to fascinate me. I've seen some gorgeous cuttlefish in Thailand and Indonesia and a number of Giant Pacific Octopuses in British Columbia but these were only about a third of the maximum size. I'd love to see a really big one (2 metres or more from tentacle tip to tentacle tip). Regardless of how intelligent they are, they are wonderful creatures.
 
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