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i did  a couple of dives on sat out of blythe the second dive was on the pandora formally called the dolphin its a 330 foot steamship which sunk in 1939 anyone know anymore about it and maybe able to direct me to a web site                           cheers paul
 

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Hi Paul,
This is about all I can get;

PANDORA (ex Dolphin) Blyth 1939

The steamship Pandora was heading for Blyth under tow to start her new career as an accommodation ship for submarine base at Blyth. She struck a mine on 23rd December 1939. She was 4580 tons, 330ft long and 43ft beam.
Depth Max 26m G.P.S. N055 32.991 W001 37.638

This site is under construction but looks like it might have a bit more info.
http://www.blythvalley.gov.uk/heri/war/war04_39.htm

Not much but it's all I can find.

Peter
 

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Respected Wreck-diving Author & Resident Farnes Ex
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Hi Paul

DOLPHIN (ex PANDORA 1914, ex SETI, 1902)
Depth: 18m lowest astronomical depth.
Reference:  55 06 085N   001 27 282W              
Location:1.5-miles SSE of Blyth.

The DOLPHIN was a steel 4,530 ton British submarine depot repair/supply steamship that had dimensions of 104.2m- length, by 13.1-m beam and a draught of 8.2metres.
She was originally built to order by Sir Raylton Dixon & Company at the Cleveland Dockyard, Middlesbrough for James Moss & Company of Liverpool and launched as the SETI by Miss Hilda Moss on the 5th July 1902 for their company's Egyptian trade. She was moulded and built to the British Corporation's highest class spar rule, had a dead-weight capacity of 3,700 tons, with a main deck of steel and the upper poop-deck, bridge and forecastle-decks of steel, but sheathed with wood. The accommodation for first class passengers was handsomely fitted at the forepart of the bridge, while the second class was situated under the aft end of the poop. The saloon framing was of beautiful Satinwood with Hungarian ash panels, relieved by Maltese- crosses with a House-flag in the centre of each panel. Her iron stanchions were covered in Satinwood with elaborately carved capitals and Tynecastle panelling on the ceiling and all lighted by a fine-combed skylight. The smoke-room, which was separately designed by Messrs Waring & Son of Liverpool, was framed in oak, with carved pillaster parquet flooring, carved grotesque beams and Tynecastle panels on the ceiling in rich relief. The whole vessel was completely installed with electric lights, electric bells and steam heating throughout. She also had a freshwater condenser, five water-tight bulkheads, water-ballast all fore and aft and aft peaks, direct steam windlasses, five powerful steam-winches and all the very latest improvements for rapid loading & reloading of her cargo. The vessel's single fine-steel screw propeller was powered by a three cylinder triple expansion steam engine that used three large single ended boilers which worked at a pressure of  180 p.s.i. developing 2,200hp. Her cylinder sizes were: 63.5 c.m. (25 inches), 106.1 c.m. (40 inches) and 177.8 c.m. (70 inches) with a 126.9 c.m. (48 inchess) stroke.
On the 9th November 1914, she was purchased by the Admiralty and renamed H.M.S. PANDORA, then between 1920 and 1921 she was converted at H.M. Dockyard at Devonport to a Submarine depot repair/supply ship and renamed again as H.M.S. DOLPHIN on 3rd October 1924. She carried a compliment of 255 crew and a fuel load of 590 tons of coal. Being a rather elderly ship, she was picked out to be a blockship in the Clyde, where she was being towed on the 23rd November 1939, however she foundered and was lost, one and a half miles south-southeast of Blyth, after detonating a German laid mine.
Wreck-site.  
This wreck is known locally by divers as the PANDORA and some still believe the DOLPHIN is a separate wreck, however they are one and the same .The wreck lies orientated almost north to south on a sea-bed of sand and stone in a general depth of 18 metres, being the lowest astronomical depth. She is well broken up and dispersed over a wide area, as the wreck was professionally salvaged, at least a couple of times in the recent past. Except for the engines and boilers, much of the wreck is partially buried with the hull sides going into the sea-bed, but the bow section is still fairly intact and stands some 6.7 metres high, which makes a very impressive sight. Most of her non-ferrous metal has now been picked clean, as the wreck has become a big attraction to a number of local diving clubs.A vast shoal of pout-whiting, about one kilo in size, plus lots of saithe, permanently swim around inside of the semi closed section of the high bow section and have adopted it as their home base. Early in the year, a few decent sized crustaceans can be found sheltering under the steel plates, framework and debris, etc. The site is best dived at low slack water, but currents are not too severe at other times, except one hour before high and low water. Visibility during the summer months has been known to reach as much as fifteen metres after a few days of dry settled weather, light westerly winds and on a neap tide. A good lookout for salmon fishermen is required during the summer months, because they drift along with the tide, with their one mile long surface monofilament drift-nets.
 
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