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DUE CEO, Booking agent, Coffee maker & Dogsbody...
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Dear Divers

The BSAC Incident Report for the last year (Sept-Sept) was released on Sat at the DOC. This document colates the incidents reported around the UK by varius agencies and those abroad that BSAC divers report.

The report will be available online on the BSAC Web site, as are previose years.

The overal summary showed a hugh 50% decrease in Fatalities since last year with 22 deaths in 2002 reduced to 11 in 2003, which is still 11 too many. Please note that the 4 unfortunate fatalities in Oct will show on next years figures.

One of the fatalities was the unfortunate woman who was run over recovering the Rib. The main conclusions drawn were that the incidents are spread fairly evenly over the skill levels and numbers diving. However Depth is still a major factor (below 50m) as at these depths there are a lot less incidents probably due to higher levels of skill, experience and preperation, but these fewer incidents have a far higher percentage of fatel results.

Several fatal incidents involved dives of only 20m or a little deeper.

Reported incidents were down as were boating incidents.

One Rescue Award was presented to 3 divers who had been involved in rescueing a Rebreather diver who passed out on a river dive to only 9m, and a very well done to them. The 3 were the guys buddy and another pair who surfaced nearby and were able to help, along with some people walking along the bank who called the emergency services.

I will post on some of the lighter incidents on another post.

Dive Safe

Paul
 

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<font color='#0000FF'>Paul

Do you have a breakdown of the fatalities.  Solo, depths, types of equipment - open, CC, agency etc.

Haven't been to Doc for some years.

Fiona
 

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A short fat well off crap cave diver. Likes wrecks
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Hi Paul

Do you have a link?

ATB

Mark Chase
 

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It's not on-line yet, I'm sure one of us BSAC-wallahs will post the link as soon as it is, makes for sobering reading. On this topic, one of my old club had a trip to the pot at the weekend, I'll post more when I know more. They'd been diving wrecks around  Loch Aline, and the diver was being released last night, is all I know at the moment .
 

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DUE CEO, Booking agent, Coffee maker & Dogsbody...
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Fiona

I can do that but not tonight as i am off out for a presentation on our club trip to Cyprus last month.

I kind of avoided that as some members here know those involved in some of these incidents, but i will do a rough breakdown. I would ask YD members to consider others before passing comments as the report has bare facts only with no comment on procedure or aportioning of blame.

Dive Safe

Paul
 

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Stuff like this reminds us that what we do is dangerous, no matter how much we try to make it safe.  
We are in an environment we were never designed to be in.  I lost a colleague to a paragliding accident in the summer - a dangerous past time just like ours.  The impact that had on everyone, his wife and kids, all of us at work, made me think about what we do and how selfish we can be sometimes, chasing our own pleasure.  

I dont want to preach but people, please be carefull.  Pushing the limits can be fun but also carries a terrible penalty if you get it wrong.


porg
 

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<font color='#0000FF'>Quite understand if you would rather not Paul.  I do always find them interesting reading though.

However I can always wait until they are released.  

Cheers

Fiona
 

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DUE CEO, Booking agent, Coffee maker & Dogsbody...
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Dear Divers

From the Incident report some extracts, these are only a few and nowhere near as comprehensive as the presentation that Brian Cumming who compiles and presents them does.

Of the 11 fatalities 5 were BSAC and 6 other agencies.

1 a Trimix Diver on 10/52 after a 90m dive was last seen at 45m and gave OK. He never surfaced.

A pair of Divers were Decoing at 6m after a 55m dive. One a Trimix diver convulsed and disapeared.

3 divers were diving to 30m. 1 gave a low air signal at 20m and started sharing with the Dive Leader. The 3rd diver assended to 20m and twice indicated a problem. The sharing pair assended to the surface but the 3rd diver never surfaced.
Total dive time 12 min.

2 Divers completed a dive to 37m, one completed his deco and surfaced, the other had a few min remaining and stayed on the shot, he never surfaced.

A diver got into difficulty and refused the AAS offered by his buddy. The buddy surfaced and raised the alarm. The diver was found at 22m unconsciouse and recovered to the boat. He was declaired Dead on arrival at hospital. (Personal comment - I have had a diver virtually out of air refuse my AAS on several occasions and i don't know why other than denial. The most extreme of these i forced my AAS on him and took him to the surface after holding his contents guage, showing zero in front of his mask at 16m).

A Solo Trimix diver diving a wreck in 66m saw another Solo Trimix diver deploy a DSMB and give OOA signal. They started assending on his Gas. He deployed a DSMB, but between 50 and 45m his Trimix ran out and he did a rapid assent to 40m switching to Nitrox32. He lost contact with the other diver at some stage during this. He did some stops on Nitrox70 and missed others surfacing and raising the alarm.

2 Divers completed a Wreck dive and deployed a DSMB. On the assent they became seperated and one failed to surface.

7 Divers were on a wreck in 63m. 1 surfaced missing all stops, another surfaced having done half his stops, a third did not surface. The 2 who surfaced were evacuated, the one who had missed all was pronounced dead on arrival at the hospital. The missing diver was found the next day entangled in netting.

A diver got into difficulty at 20m and surfaced, but was unconsciouse on the surface. A rescue was conducted but the diver was declared dead on arrival at the hospital.

A group of divers were recovering a Rib when one fell under the wheels and recieved fatal injuries.

A diver entered a part of a wreck that had previously been inaccessible. Once inside the visibility quickly reduced and he was unable to find his way out.

I have tried to keep these down to the bare facts as in the report. Please consider those in YD who know people involved in these incidents before passing any comments

I think the bare bones show that this is not a sport to be taken lightly no matter how shallow or deep or how inexperienced or qualified and experienced you are. We should all take the chance to learn from others missfortune and hopefully reduce these figures even more in the future.

Dive Safe

Paul
 

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Do the figures include the total number of dives in the UK for the year?

It would be interesting to find out the actual risk in our somewhat harsh conditions.
 

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[b said:
Quote[/b] (John Nortcliff @ Dec. 03 2003,23:55)]Do the figures include the total number of dives in the UK for the year?
That could only be a guestimate.

Who do you report all your dives to so they can tally them? Do you even log them all? How many divers are there?

And so on.

I'm a little surprised the report is not online by now, but I can't find it.

Adrian
 

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I guess, but perhaps we can have a go.

In another post, someone reckoned there were 200 000 divers in the UK, but only 25 000 dived regularly.  I have no idea whether this is correct, but (using last years figures) it places the odds somewhere between 11 in 100 000 and 88 in
100 000 (per diver)

The UK figures for road traffic fatalities are 6 per 100 000 (head of population).

I don't think that our chasing pleasure in this way is selfish.  We only have one shot.


UK figures
http://www.statistics.gov.uk

US figures:
http://www.nsc.org/lrs/statinfo/odds.htm
 

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[b said:
Quote[/b] (John Nortcliff @ Dec. 04 2003,10:02)]The UK figures for road traffic fatalities are 6 per 100 000 (head of population).
The fun we can have with stats.

As you are 2.5 time more likely to die on non M,A(M) and A roads than the faster roads, I could conclude it is safer to drive at 70 on a motorway, than 30 around the town...The stats

Back to us. I am always bothered by head/population stats. With us we have a, thankfully, small set of deaths to work with. And some may only be indirectly related to diving. The trailer incident comes to mind. Depending how you include such deaths distorts your final result.

And we are a self selecting set of the population. So we already distort the stats. Not everybody dives, but nearly everybody has been exposed to risk on the road.

The BSAC stats have a go at quantifying depth or experience in relation to incidents. I don't know how grade is normalised, ie there may be more lower grade divers than higer grade, so just a higher number of low grade incidents may not mean anything as a figure on its own.

Adrian
 

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Very sobering reading.

But I agree with Adrian, stats  looked at in isolation can be very misleading and I've known a fair few divers who are reasonably sensible suddenly adopt behaviours that contradict all their training, so "grade normalisation" could be seen as somewhat immaterial as there's nothing to stop someone who should know better from following through on ill-concieved dive plans.

Personally, when heading off diving, I always like to bear in mind how my sister would feel if she had to bury another one of her brothers, tends to keep me in the realms of SDPs.
 

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For comparison, and bearing in mind the limitations of statistics already mentioned, you might be interested to know that here in Sweden we have had on average 3-4 deaths a year for the last 10 years. It is estimated that we do about half a million dives a year, so the fatality risk is of the order of 1 per 125 000 dives, making diving a low-risk pastime cpmpared to many others (e.g. horse-riding).
 

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I know statistics aren't perfect, but I think it is important to have some sort of estimate.
I used per head to compare to the traffic stats, but also had a go at per dive.  I reckoned 650 000 dives a year (25 000 divers doing 26 dives per year) - quite a conservative estimate I think.  Fatalities would be around 1 in 30 000 dives.

The point is that it's not a high risk activity, contrary to what some people might feel.  There is in fact a worry in the industry that diving is now seen as too safe to attract thrill seekers.
 

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DUE CEO, Booking agent, Coffee maker & Dogsbody...
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Guys

I missed this one and i have added it to the original listing:-

A diver entered a part of a wreck that had previously been inaccessible. Once inside the visibility quickly reduced and he was unable to find his way out.

With regard to the breakdown of incidents Brian Cumming includes a lot in the report and shows many of these on his presentation. I could not do them justice here but many areas are hard to clearly define.

There is a baseline of 2 deaths a year that will always be there as this is due to natural causes during a dive.

It is very hard to break down by skill level as this would require comparisons of accurate figures for each level.

A rough guide in one of his graphs too levels involved covers those incidents involving BSAC divers by grade:-

Novice = 10, Ocean Diver = 25, Sport Diver = 54, Dive Leader = 46, Advanced Diver = 44, First Class Diver = 2.

So it looks like SD has the highest risks, but this is also the highest membership level, so is it a higher risk group?


DCI Incidents

122 Reports which featured 132 cases of DCI in the 2003 report year. (168 in 2002, 116 in 2001, 134 in 2000, 86 in 1999).

33 involved repeat diving.
32 involved diving deeper than 30m
31 involved rapid ascents
18 involved missed deco stops
Some involved more than 1 of these causes.

The main cause of these is poor buoyancy control resulting in rapid ascents and missed stops, and poor DSMB deployment.

The other two notable factors are dehydration and not taking an off gas break/day on multi-day dive trips.

Dive Safe

Paul
 

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I know of 5/6 DCI's that don't get a mention in there. All of which I would instantly recognise. Mine(SSAC) is nowhere to be seen, Dee's(SSAC) is maybe there but some of the info. doesn't add up, the incredible CF at the (SSAC) training day isn't mentioned and that ended up with 3 AFAIK, at least 2, chambered and another 1 from (SSAC) on the same day as the CF.
 I can see a definate trend there. I wonder if;
(a) The info. isn't being asked for by BSAC from SSAC or
(b) SSAC is burying it's head in the sand and trying to sort it out "in-house".

Seems odd though!!!!!

Peter
 

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Perhaps they just don't report them well. What is SCOTSAC's reporting procedure? I can't find a form on their website. Could be decause they don't have one...

BTW, how do PADI,TDI et al divers report incidents when not diving with a business? BSAC members have a form they are supposed to fill out. As the other organisations are not member based in the same way as BSAC/SAA/SCOTSAC, I wonder what you do apres shit/fan interface?

Adrian
 
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