YD Scuba Diving Forums banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Hmmm
Joined
·
2,744 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
What a champion. Gold in the 5,000 metres, the 1,500m, the 800m and the marathon!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
339 Posts
As opposed to some footballer who gets paid millions a year and who trains for, ooooh, several hours a week and whose success is measured in how effectively he crumples to the floor when someone comes within a couple of yards of him? I hope so.

On another tack, have you seen the skills of the blind footballers? To tackle someone with the ball, listen to the sound of the ball coming towards you fast, and then run towards it. And don't flinch. That's bravery. Do they get injured? Yup. Do they cry about it? Nope.
 

·
Hmmm
Joined
·
2,744 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
We were lucky enough to watch some of the blind long jumping and I was stunned by their bravery. Professional footballers have really got to up their game to catch my attention again.
 

·
Bashing head against brick wall
Joined
·
2,105 Posts
Which just goes to show how valueless a Paralympic medal is. There is no way an able bodied athlete would be able to complete such a feat as they place such different demands on fitness and physiology of an elite athlete. It was fine as an idea when it started which was to get disabled people back into sport and enjoying life to the full. I just think we've lost the plot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,795 Posts
Which just goes to show how valueless a Paralympic medal is. There is no way an able bodied athlete would be able to complete such a feat as they place such different demands on fitness and physiology of an elite athlete. It was fine as an idea when it started which was to get disabled people back into sport and enjoying life to the full. I just think we've lost the plot.
No, I think you have. Get used to the fact that different people have different abilities. For me the irony of the Paralympics is that discrimination MUST exist for it to work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,795 Posts
It's fine you're entitled to your opinion but just remember you're paying for it as well.
I've paid for the Olympics too, I don't see why I should have to pay for one and not the other. Not paying for both would be equitable.

I'd rather not pay for the BBC SPOTY. It's not as if it's about personality. Why can they just admit to choosing the most favourite winner? Or losing underdog when UK sport success has been grim.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,557 Posts
You haven't really made yourself clear, Steve. Why is it valueless? Is is a set of elite competition amongst those eligible to compete, and played under a global and controlled set of laws.

Not everyone has to be able to compete at everything. I bet Chris Hoy is a rubbish 5000m runner.
 

·
Bashing head against brick wall
Joined
·
2,105 Posts
Lou, apologies if I wasn't clear. It the fact that one person can be the best at so many different types of event, albeit all running (I appreciate he's in a wheelchair). The type of fitness and physiology need to win the 800m and the marathon for an able bodied athlete mean that it could never happen. In my eyes this shows Paralympic sport medals to be both easier and of less 'value'.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,638 Posts
You think something that gives people a 'can do' attitude is valueless? I think you need to reassess your value structure... I think that sort of thing is worth it's weight in gold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,795 Posts
Lou, apologies if I wasn't clear. It the fact that one person can be the best at so many different types of event, albeit all running (I appreciate he's in a wheelchair). The type of fitness and physiology need to win the 800m and the marathon for an able bodied athlete mean that it could never happen. In my eyes this shows Paralympic sport medals to be both easier and of less 'value'.
Put yourself in the chair and see how easy it is.
I don't see then of having less value. The looks of joy on their faces after months and years of preparation is no different for the athletes at either 'lympics. Some of the competitions/sport are different by their very nature. They are not 'less' or 'easier'. Try murderball sometime and see if you think that is easier. Or if that's too tough for you, blind five aside football - you can do that blindfolded.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,030 Posts
GB's 'Weirwolf' Wins Wheelchair Marathon

Has anybody ever heard "his trade mark Weirwolf howl" that he does or is this just lazy journo's getting mixed up with the fans? :eek:mg: (never get those right?!)

I have gotta say I've enjoyed the coverage on 4 and have been surprised it been that good to be honest.

I'll be sad when it's over again like I was a few weeks ago and theres nothing a bit more exciting to watch on tv than the usual.

Don't get me wrong I know nothing about all those olympics sports but have enjoyed finding out by bugging the missus to explain them all :teeth:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,407 Posts
Lou, apologies if I wasn't clear. It the fact that one person can be the best at so many different types of event, albeit all running (I appreciate he's in a wheelchair). The type of fitness and physiology need to win the 800m and the marathon for an able bodied athlete mean that it could never happen. In my eyes this shows Paralympic sport medals to be both easier and of less 'value'.
It's not a case of the events being easier but different. David Weir is an outstanding athlete with skills that many able-bodied athletes must envy. Not all the competitors entered all the races that he did because they didn't have the capability. Just like able-bodied athletes, the Paralympians tend to specialise and concentrate on particular events/distances. Just because David Weir can win at a range of distances, doesn't mean that the events are much easier - the Paralympians are just as fiercely competitive as their Olympian counterparts - if not more so because of the difficulties they have had to overcome just to compete.

I think the Paralympics have been an inspiration. These are elite athletes who have a disability, not disabled people who are playing at doing easy sport. Did you see the wheelchair basketball player with only one arm? She had an amazing technique of being able to keep her chair going in a straight line by flicking sideways with her upper body at the same time as bouncing the ball. And you think that's easy. How about swimming with no arms? The times that some of the blade runners achieved were also extremely fast. I doubt many people on YD could come anywhere close.

In many ways, their medals are worth more than the Olympic medals because of what they have had to overcome in order to compete, let alone win a medal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
Watching a blind/semi blind athlete run 200m or a cerebral palsy athlete running faster than I have ever been able to us amazing.

Blind footballers scoring against a sighted keeper.

The whole Paralympics has been amazing and I have been lucky enough to know several of the British Paralympic team which made it even better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,557 Posts
Steve - I think the issue is that you are comparing them to the able-bodied version. I don't think that you can. A wheelchair event is not a straight swap for a running event. The physiologies, considerations and tactics make it an entirely different proposition. You remove the weight bearing effect so that changes some of the traditional concepts of builds that runners have, for example.

Looking at other events, the classifications level the field, but the fact that times or distances may decline as the classification gets lower doesn't mean the categories are easier - quite the opposite. It means there is more challenge involved in other ways.

At some events the times are amazing - 21 second 200m with only 10% vision? Without being able to learn to race by watching others? You mask our national 200m runners and see how close they get.

I really think that you are doing a great disservice, to the athletes and to yoursel by not being able to step beyond the concept of only one sort of best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,407 Posts
My wife has been a volunteer at the Athletes Village has has met quite a lot of the Paralympians. She said that the determination and commitment that they show really does change the way that you think about disability. My wife is disabled herself with severe back problems but it is nothing compared to what most of these athletes have to cope with. It should be very much a case of what they can do, not what they can't do like the archer with no arms who loads the arrow with her feet and releases the bow with a pulley controlled by her mouth.

When my wife and I were diving in British Columbia some years ago, one of the boat skippers was telling us about a diving club for the disabled in Vancouver. They called themselves 'The Gimps'. One guy had no legs and they used to pick him up and drop him in the water. He swum using his hands.
 

·
Hacked off member
Joined
·
2,217 Posts
How many medals did Mark Spitz win in one Olympics once?
How many medals did Michael Phelps win in one Olympics once?

So what's wrong with a paralympian winning several?

In swimming it's very common for one person to win several events...obviously the physical demands of 100m Freestyle and 400m Individual Medley etc are not that different so they win several medals. It must be the same in wheelchair racing, perhaps a smooth technique is all that really matters and there is a limit to the 'arm swing' cadence.

Watching the Paralympics has been amazing and very humbling.


EDIT: As far as the SPOTY is concerned, I think they should suspend it for this year as there are too many valid contenders!!
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top