YD Scuba Diving Forums banner

1 - 20 of 46 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,914 Posts
Imported post

And it's not just avoiding DCI that's the issue, diabetes and cancer are all associated with being overweight. Plus I would definately expect that if there was enough money to research it properly, we'd probably find dietary factors other than obesity were influencing DCI occurence (or lack of), but no ones going to be spending money to find out about it so these are just my pet hypotheses for the moment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,343 Posts
Imported post

I remember hearing somewhere that after a certain body size, blood volume decreases proportinally as size increases. I don't know if its an old wifes tale or not but it would explain why large people are more prone to DCS - They have a greater area of tissue to off gas than average but the same volume of blood as some smaller than them!

Can someone medical confirm/deny this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
Imported post

i'm no medic but that doesn't make sense - surely blood would increase proportionally.....otherwise there'd be a load of lardarse people with hypoxic extremities.    
 

·
The Bridget Jones of Diving
Joined
·
585 Posts
Imported post

[b said:
Quote[/b] (Nick Bown @ April 08 2004,11:41)]Sorry, didn't make that very clear.... The idea is that a 120kg person has the same blood volume as a 80kg person which explains why there is more strain on their heart.
In an average healthy adult, the volume of blood is about one-eleventh of the body weight.

Actually volume of blood varies from individual to individual...

People who are overweight grow blood vessels to connect areas of fat to the circulatory system. That's one of the reasons why people who are overweight burn more calories than people who are not....
 

·
Notice my avatar. I am hard astern.
Joined
·
9,347 Posts
I am not worried about the effects of obesity. I am more worried about the prevalence of the mis-spelled word 'definately' on this forum. It is definitely wrong!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,240 Posts
JB said:
I am not worried about the effects of obesity. I am more worried about the prevalence of the mis-spelled word 'definately' on this forum. It is definitely wrong!
Whilst I agree whole-heartedly mate - I am tempted, just this once, to say........S.U.M.O.


:D :D
 

·
Notice my avatar. I am hard astern.
Joined
·
9,347 Posts
Over on divernet are people claiming that it is OK to be fat. Some are in the armed forces and state they have a high degree of fitness. Of course fitness and longevity (good health) may be two different things. But doesn't being bigger make you an easier target? It did in my day (which is why I quickly changed careers!).
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bethi

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,240 Posts
Fat is bad for your wealth, survey warns 60 million obese Americans
By Harry Mount in New York
(Filed: 05/08/2005)

Research claiming that being fat makes you poor has brought bad news for 60 million obese Americans.

It has long been known that being overweight is bad for your health. In the US 112,000 people a year die from illnesses related to obesity. Now a study by New York University shows that fat is bad for your wealth, too.

Researchers found that a 10 per cent increase in a woman's body mass cut her income by six per cent. They also found that overweight women were less likely to be college graduates and more likely to work in the less skilled industries.

While it is not surprising that obese people spend more on medical costs, diets and multiple airline seats than thinner people, the research also shows that they have lower incomes, are less likely to hold managerial jobs and are more likely to miss work. When fat people marry, their spouses earn less than the thin.

"There is no single smoking gun to explain it," said Roland Sturm, a health expert with the Rand Corporation, a Santa Monica think-tank.

"But it is clear that for obese people, especially the morbidly obese, their weight can affect how well they do financially."

It is still not certain whether being fat makes you poor, or being poor makes you fat, but other research also suggests that a person's size does affect their wages.

Jay Zagorsky, an economist at Ohio State University, has carried out research showing that people who lose significant amounts of weight also experience a corresponding rise in their wealth.

Mr Zagorsky, who has tracked the weight and wealth of 2,000 teenagers for 20 years. said: "Their salary is more likely to increase disproportionately once they lose the weight."

By the time the teenagers turned 39, a strong pattern had emerged: those of normal weight were twice as rich as the obese.

Despite prominent health warnings and the trend followed by many of the fast-food outlets of selling healthier products, the number of obese Americans continues to grow, doubling in the past 25 years.

The number of morbidly obese Americans - those who are more than 100lb over their ideal weight - has grown to nine million.
 

·
Thats MISTER Blue Boots to you....
Joined
·
9,371 Posts
There is some indirect truth to the "bad for your wealth" argument. I was once 25 stone plus, and over a period have trimmed down to just over 15 stone, and just recently landed a better job, wheras I'd always been turned down before.
It could be fluke, coincidence, or even that I am a bit more self confident since losing the weight, but you do tend to find that excessively fat people do find it harder to change jobs....
I guess its the likelihood of them being long term sick that puts employers off...
 

·
Please delete all my posts
Joined
·
12,604 Posts
ratcliffe said:
There is some indirect truth to the "bad for your wealth" argument. I was once 25 stone plus, and over a period have trimmed down to just over 15 stone, and just recently landed a better job, wheras I'd always been turned down before.
It could be fluke, coincidence, or even that I am a bit more self confident since losing the weight, but you do tend to find that excessively fat people do find it harder to change jobs....
I guess its the likelihood of them being long term sick that puts employers off...

You need to PM me on how you did it I have gone from 16.5 stone up to 18 stone recently and in a short space of time too.
 

·
Thats MISTER Blue Boots to you....
Joined
·
9,371 Posts
PM pending...

Links to diet websites not included :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Pretty Flowers said:
In an average healthy adult, the volume of blood is about one-eleventh of the body weight.

Actually volume of blood varies from individual to individual...

People who are overweight grow blood vessels to connect areas of fat to the circulatory system. That's one of the reasons why people who are overweight burn more calories than people who are not....
I also read that the "average male" takes 2 pints of blood to get a hard on... so any of you people have strange and obscene thoughts about fish or lobsters... beware.... arousal will increase your risk of DCI as there will be less blood circulating round your body!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
855 Posts
2 pints!!!
Doesn't sound that average to me (unless the wife is correct and I have got a tiny penis?)
 

·
So much more than a child's play thing!
Joined
·
2,725 Posts
Mr T. said:
Fat is bad for your wealth, survey warns 60 million obese Americans
Good news as MrsDragon and myself have lost just over 5 stone between us since May. When does the money start coming in, Friday night would be good, just in time for the Dive show :D

Gareth
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,240 Posts
A quarter of adults are now classed as obese
By Sarah Womack, Social Affairs Correspondent
(Filed: 17/12/2005)


Obesity levels in Britain have almost doubled in the past decade, new figures show.

Almost one in four men and women in England were obese last year, a study by the Health and Social Care Information Centre found.

In men, the rates of obesity almost doubled in 10 years - from 13.2 per cent in 1993 to 23.6 per cent in 2004. For women the increase was slightly lower - from 16.4 per cent in 1993 to 23.8 per cent in 2004.

Doctors and campaigners have given a warning that the health consequences of obesity will in the future be a substantial burden on health services - as more people contract related diseases such as diabetes - and the economy. There are also concerns that young people will fare worse when it comes to becoming overweight or even obese at an earlier age. The research showed that body mass index (BMI) - a measure of weight in relation to height - was rising in young people.

Since 1995, the average BMI for boys increased from 17.6 to 18.1 in those aged two to 15. In girls, the average BMI increased from 18 to 18.4 in less than 10 years.

The report said: "This rise, although small, is nevertheless an indicator that children in England are on average getting bigger."

The research also showed that the number of smokers has decreased in the past 10 years.
 
1 - 20 of 46 Posts
Top