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I've just read this little snippet on Divernet's news board and thought it might be worth some discussion.

UK INCIDENTS REVEAL LESS FATALITIES, BUT MORE BENDS
The BSAC Incidents Report for 2002 shows 14 UK diver deaths - down from 22 in 2001; but contrary to world-wide trends, the accidents involving decompression illness have escalated dramatically.
The annual publication of reported UK diving incidents provides a useful guide to understanding current UK diving practices. The most notable aspect of the 2002 figures was that decompression incidents have become the largest recorded category, showing an increase of 37% when compared to an average of the last four years' figures. Research carried out on an international level by Divers Alert Network (DAN) indicated that globally, occurences of decompression illness were decreasing.
A higher number of incidents were reported on deep dives in 2002, suggesting that UK divers are undertaking deeper dives. Unfortunately the proportion of incidents at depth resulting in a fatality or serious injury clearly demonstrate that deep dives (over 50m) carry a significantly higher risk.
On a positive note, the overall trend reflected in the report appears to be towards safer diving practices. Considering the growing numbers of qualified UK divers and the huge number of dives carried out in a year, the tiny number of accidents indicates that the sport is generally very safe.
The BSAC Incidents report 2002 will be available shortly on the BSAC website 9 December 2002


Fantastic to see less fatalities but what on earth is happening within the UK to bring on nearly a 40% increase in DCI hits while the rest of the world is reducing this figure, your thoughts..

Dave.
 

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My personal feeling is that some of these are attributable to the modern attitude of trying to get things "over with" as soon as possible in order to get to the next thing  (which must also me done a quickly as possible... ad infinitum)

I haven't had a bend myself (yet, touch wood!), but earlier this year, while I was DO of my old club, one of our divers (18 year old first year undergrad) got a ride in a chopper with her buddy (from another student club) who did have a bend (I was not on this dive trip).

They had done a 35-ish metre dive and had ignored our club's 'rule' of compulsory 'safety stops': 1 min for 10m; 3 for 20m; 5 for 30m etc; as a BSAC  club these are/were ad hoc for that club. When I asked why she hadn't done them she argued something along the lines that: it wasn't a branch trip so our club's "special rules" didn't apply, "and anyway we just wanted to get back and chill with the rest of the guys in case we missed anything..."

The fact that these 'rules' were brought in for the safety of her and her ilk seemed incomprehensible :ne_nau:

Some bends are preventable and some are not as many of us have been taught already; IMHO a number of avoidable bends will continue to occur as long as people treat their own safety with such scant regard in a desire to get one with something else.  It would seem that in diving, patience can be a bit more than a virtue

Safe bubbling y'all
Steve

(Edited by Steve W at 7:52 pm on Dec. 9, 2002)
 

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I agree with Steve.

There seems to be a trend to wanna get deep too quickly.

You spend a hour or two in the Oban Inn in Oban or the Mishnish in Tobermory and listen to some of the guys who've come to dive the wrecks in the Sound of Mull.

"Well we got down to the botton at about 48m and pissed around for 25 minutes. I saw some scallops so I said their mine and ..."

You can imagine the rest - too deep for experience (sometimes), no descernable dive plan, buddies going missing, not enough gas, no training on high o2 mixes for decco, inability to hold decco stops.

And you know what - lisen to 'em you didn't hear about the incredible corals, fantastic light, the fish !!! or anything apart from what they'd brought back up.

I'm not against people collecting stuff to eat - far from it but you don't deviate from your plan at nearly 50m - if you had one for a few crustacea.

Bends are never completely avoidable unless you stay on the boat but there's stuff we all know to lessen the chances of getting bent - unfortunately only some of us follow the better advice.

Be safe everybody and be lucky.
 

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Hey Dave,

I think one of the reasons is what we saw at the Cape the other day: that 'instructor' with the 'Polaris' twins on their 'Rescue Course'...... Grim mate, grim. Incidents looking for a venue.
 

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I have been diving for almost 20 years and have noticed a distinct arrogance amongst some divers.  Two friends of mine are Academics who also dive and they are aware of this trend, because they have been researching the nature of divers over the past 4 or 5 years.  It looks to me like there are some divers who are more interested in their image than taking the time to really understand what dive tables are about.  Furthermore, there has been very few deco incidents or otherwise from ScotSAC divers, why is this so, are ScotSAC divers better trained?

(Edited by Big Steph at 8:37 pm on Dec. 9, 2002)
 

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Sounds interesting Bren, care to fill us in?
 

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why is this so, are ScotSAC divers better trained?

2 main theories....

1) ScotSAC training takes sooo bloody long the trainees get pissed off and go over to PADI
2) The BDO is a ball-buster that will not let you out without himself and three sheperds if you go past 20m...

:lol:
 

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Not being one to get turned on by `it went up by 37% - shock/horror` statistics, here is a simple question:

Actually how many incidents versus how many dives


For example - if there were 3 incidents in the previous year and 4 this year then we have a 30% increase. If there were 2 zillion dives then the mathematics is 4 fifths of fcuk all.

Does anyone have the numbers


I`m not trying to knock the problem - I dont want to be one of the ones who get hit - but some perspective could balance things ??
 

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</span>
[b said:
Quote[/b] ]Quote: from Driftwood on 8:43 pm on Dec. 9, 2002
why is this so, are ScotSAC divers better trained?

2 main theories....

1) ScotSAC training takes sooo bloody long the trainees get pissed off and go over to PADI

Yes, training can take a while, but worth it in the end as the training cost eff all.

2) The BDO is a ball-buster that will not let you out without himself and three sheperds if you go past 20m...

Unfortunatly, some BDO's are arseholes

:lol:
<span =''>
 

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A wise man Kirky, we all know what D'Israeli said about there being "Lies, #### lies, and statistics".

Anyhoo for the actual (BSAC) numbers see:
<a href="http://www.bsac.org/techserv/increp01/statistics01.htm

And" target="_blank">http://www.bsac.org/techserv/increp01/statistics01.htm

And</a> to download the BSAC Incident Report for 2001 see:
<a href="http://www.bsac.org/techserv/increp01/intro.htm

Mind" target="_blank">http://www.bsac.org/techserv/increp01/intro.htm

Mind</a> , it also reports every RNLI boat called out,  even when its not particularly life threatening (I'm in there somewhere for one of those)
Chee-az
Steve
 

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Steve

I'm in one of those callouts as well which was purley a precaution for 2 overdue divers who's bubbles we'd lost in the chop and failing light.

Mind you its a good job Dover Port authority don't report everything, could have had our own page.

I read the report on the train after the DOC and there is some very spookey stuff. Some of the fatalities are particularly relevant haveing seen divers recieving awards for life saving attempts at the Conf in relation to those incidents.

Regards

Paul
 

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Another reason for the rise in DCS is possibly that diving seems to be appealing to the " EXTREME" types. How often do you hear the conversations revolving around how deep and how long, it is not a competition!!
 

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Here what you're saying Phil, but I'd bet my mortgage that the vast majority of incidents occur with the 'newbie' or recently trained divers that simply hit a situation that they either have not the training to sort out or simply panic and it goes thru'pennies on them.
 

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Bren
Further big increase is shown in those that have been diving between 5 and 10 yrs, maybe they have just changed kit or gone onto more testing diving. Could well be of course that they have got cocky. Steve's correct patience is more than a virtue in diving. I enjoy the saftey stops on my rec. diving, always do them regardless of what the tables say, I like the peace and tranquility of the dive the surface stuff gets in the way of the dive really.
Matt

(Edited by MATTBIN at 5:45 pm on Dec. 12, 2002)
 

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Could be Bren, or more likely what Matt says, familiarity breeds contempt, and all that sort of thing
Keep little bubbles little !!!!!!!
 

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I recall that the DAN figures for diver injuries in 2000 showed the plurality of injured divers were at entry level, with almost the same number at post - entry level. However, the plurality of injured divers had been diving for more than 10 years; with the next largest group at 6 to 10 years and only the third largest group at <1 year. Colossally noticeably the plurality of injured divers had done 0-19 dives in the 12 months before their accident. Most injuries occurred in the first day where there was a multi day series of dives. Buoyancy (including rapid ascent) caused the majority of problems. What does this tell us? I would suggest that it is not the *newbie* as such who gets injured but the rusty diver who doesn't dive much and has not pursued qualifications (people who slag off 'badge hunters' take note).
The moral?
Go diving!
(And be safe)
:confined:
 

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I'm sure your right, Paul. Rusty divers are dangerous divers. I know people who've been diving for years but dive so seldom that they're rusty on almost every dive they do. Familiarity may breed contempt but it also means you're suficiently experienced to have a reasonable chance of geting yourself out of any problems you may get yourself into. So, I second your call - go diving!
 

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That seems to confirm what I read and I must agree that rusty divers would seem to get more than their fair share of injuries. It seems that in this sport constant practice is very necessary, even if its only in the pool through the winter months else a nast shock potentially waits for us next Spring when we try that first dive at 30m with equipment that has been lying around doing nothing for 6 months.
Matt
 

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Furthermore, there has been very few deco incidents or otherwise from ScotSAC divers, why is this so, are ScotSAC divers better trained?

While i am happy about SSAC having very few incidents, don't forget that PADI/NAUI divers have very few also, does it follow they are also doing something right?

DM
 

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(Edited by darthmoll at 12:01 pm on Dec. 14, 2002)
 
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