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Team Starburst
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<font color='#736AFF'>I finally gave in and bought some dry gloves-blue marigolds full of fleece. They make my hands very chunky, but nice and warm. I have used them twice at Stoney and could actually use my hands at the end of the dives.

Apart from the need for adjusting the seals so blood actually reaches my hands, using plenty of talc, and allowing plenty of time for reaching into pockets during a dive. Does anyone have any words of wisdom on using these gloves?
 

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To dive or not to dive - that's not even an option
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Try folding the rubber seal into the glove before pushing your hand in. This also traps air which you need to prevent squeeze. If you are going deeper than around 25m, you will have to make sure they are blown up like boxing gloves before the dive. People knock them for clumsyness, but I was in the water at the weekend on four training dives and there is no way I could have done that with neoprene gloves and still be able to teach.

James
 

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<font color='#000080'>I have found the squeeze not too bad on dives. I use the Typhoon blue ones with orange fleece inside, probably similar to yours. If your diving deep, then with a latex wrist seal air in your suit pushes the seal into the glove and the preasure is equalised by air seaping into the glove. Try not to touch any sharp objects as the gloves are not too abrasive resistant. I have managed to fix a couple of leaks with a camping glue called Seam Sealer. It sets to a rubber and covers any holes which may appear. I have just added larger zip straps to my pockets so I can get to them with the drygloves on. If you are unlucky enough to have a leak, once back at home turn the gloves inside out, wash briefly in fresh water and put them somewhere warm, not on a hot radiator. Once dry turn them the right way round and they're good as new (after gluing any holes that is). Watch the glued holes as the glue perishes after six - eight months. Chalk the outside black rubber of the wrist section, which sits on the black plastic ring, held in place by the three rubber o-rings as the rubber bending back on itself tends to perish and crack after prolonged exposure to sun light and sea water. On assent try not to have too much air run up your arm (if you have a baggy membrane/compresses neoprene suit) as this leaks into the glove which balloons as the air in it expands. If this does happen make a tight fist and the latex wrist seal on the suit will invert allowing air to retun to the suit and giving you dexterity again.

Of course this all sounds complex and some will question all the hastle, but in winter, with ice on the surface and cold water freezing you top lip off, warm and toasty hands make all the difference.

Dave C
 

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The guys I've seen use them just put a small straw under the wrist seal and into the glove, this allows the gloves to balance.
 

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just got a pair of dry  gloves they are a real pain to get on and off but they do work ,as I get really cold hands most of the time .
does anyone know if you can get  dry hoods as well ?
Fiona.
 

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You can certainly get a dry hood fitted to your drysuit cause my old DO had one fitted due to continous ear infections. It did make it a real pain to don the suit though.
 

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<font color='#000080'>I'm not a great fan of dry gloves, and have opted for the 3 finger mitts, and I've got to say I was impressed with them. Whereas with 5 finger gloves (5mm) a few weeks ago I couldn't barely use my hands after the dive, and it actually hurt to use my hands, after the dive this time I was happily sitting and messing about without any gloves on in very cold conditions, and I was fine.

If anyone finds dry gloves a pain, or can't get on with the loss of deterity, try the 3 finger option. Made the difference for me.

If you want straws for the seals to balance the suit and gloves, a mate uses cut up ones from WD40 cans, as they won't get crushed against your wrist by the seal.
 

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I'd recommend getting a ring system fitted if you're going to use them regularly - makes them easier to get on & off, and allows air migration.

But I'd also recommend ditching dry gloves in favour of 3-finger mitts as well..
 

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I had dry gloves with the ring system and would definitely say don't use them to anyone thinking of buying a pair.
After the rings have been on the wrist seals for about a month the wrist seals are so stretched that they are useless if you remove the gloves.
Also if you get a hole in the gloves you will let water into the drysuit if using this method.
I have had two sets the second set got a two inch gash in one of the gloves (they where two weeks old and cost £50) whilst on a dive, I had 30 Min's deco it was very cold and very wet, not nice.
 

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<font color='#8D38C9'>I use dry gloves throughout the winter months as there is no way I can do anything useful with wet gloves when it's sooooo cold! I don't find the squeeze to much of a problem, just have to make sure there's enough air in them on the surface for the depth of dive. When I brought mine, the shop told me you shouldn't overlap the seals of your drysuit and gloves (ie. put the seal of the dry glove over the drysuit seal), as this could cause a leak. I have wondered for sometime if this is the case, as surely overlapping them will allow air migration from drysuit to glove, as mentioned by Dave C. Anyone have any experience of ovelapping the seals?
I've heard about the straw technique too, but am a bit suspect that this could leak water into the drysuit - does anyone know if it does?

Jen
 

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<font color='#000080'>I use the rings permenantly. I used to get strange looks in summer but now everyone just knows I use them year round. I tried the WD40 straw once and found it quite uncomfortable. But then I may have just had it a little too long/in the wrong place. The gloves just click off with the rings, very handy. As for rips and leaks, I just don't touch anything.

Dave C
 
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