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<font color='#000F22'>can anyone please give me any info on the duncarron.she was sunk  7 sept 1941 10 mile n/ne of cromer, norfolk.
a work mates grandfather was killed on this boat and he is looking for info. i told him i know just the people to ask
cheers
 

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Hi Mark,

It's more about the Eikhaug really
She met her final fate when she was torpedoed by the fast attack boat S-52 in the early morning hours of Sept. 7-1941 while on a voyage in convoy from Southend to Grangemouth with a cargo of 1745 tons cement. A visitor to my website, whose source is "Shipwreck Index of the British Isles" has told me that the position given in that source is 10 miles north/northeast of Cromer, Norfolk, 52 57N 01 17 30E, adding that the E-boats came from Von Batge&#8217;s 4th Flotilla. I've also seen the position given as 1.5 miles east of Sheringham, but don't know the area well enough to determine whether this is in reality more or less the same place.

According to "Nortraships flåte" the escorting Versatile saw a fast vessel approaching the convoy, but hesitated to take action for fear of attacking friendly forces, since the boat was seen passing only 400 meters from a patrol boat, which showed no signs of alarm. By the time Versatile had determined it was an enemy vessel it was already too late; 4 torpedoes were observed, and immediately afterwards, Eikhaug and the British DUNCARRON were hit. 4 men, who were asleep in their cabins awoke from the explosion and ran to the deck to find the afterpart under water. They all jumped overboard and when they came to the surface their ship was gone. They were able to cling to the remains of the hatches floating up, until they were picked up 15 minutes later by the escort (Versatile?). They thought they had heard cries from others in the water, but when they were rescued no other survivors could be found. 12 Norwegians, including captain Nygård, 2 British and 1 Spanish died.


S-50 + S-52
S 52
Fr. Lürrsen, Bremens
12845
22.08.1941
the boat sank on the 7 September 1941 under lieutenant to the lake Müller the Norwegian freighter Eikhaug with 1,436 brt.  

S 50
Fr. Lürrsen, Bremens
12843
28.07.1941
the boat sunk on the 7 September 1941 under lieutenant to the lake Karcher the British freighter Duncarron with 478 brt.


Sooooo. She was in a convoy with the Eikhaug going from Southend to Grangemouth and was torpedoed early Sept 7th 1941 by S-50 part of 4th flotilla. Not much but 'tis all I could find.

Peter
 

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<font color='#000F22'>cheers peter,
                 thanks for the information. hopefully there will be a few more people on this board with with other bits of info. i would really like to dive this wreck if it is at all possible and take a few photos for my friend.
once again thanks
             mark
 

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brought this back from the dead as there are a lot more people on here now anybody know of this ship ?

cheers
mark
 

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Duncarron

Hi Mark

The DUNCARRON was 478-tons with dimensions of 164ft by length, a 25ft beam & 10ft draught. She was built as Yard No.548 in 1914 as the WHINHILL by Russell & Co. Ltd. at Aberdeen and was powered by a 3-cyl triple expansion steam engine giving 81bhp. In 1917 she transferred to Mason Shipping Co. Ltd. (W. Mason & Co.) of Aberdeen. In 1927 the managers became J.E. Fisher of Liverpool and in 1933 was taken over by Buchan & Hogg of Grangemouth as managers. She was renamed DUNCARRON and purchased by the Duncarron Steam Ship Co. Ltd. with the managers still Buchan & Hogg.
On 7 September 1941 when carrying a 520-ton cargo of cement on passage from London for Lossiemouth she was attacked by German E-boats. Three DEMS gunners and six crew were lost.
The wreck lies 10-miles north of Cromer at 53 06.05N 01 20.85E in 23m, at the lowest astronomical depth, with the wreck standing 3m high.
The GPS position should be: 53 06’.046 N 001 20’.802 E, according to the ARCS Skipper charts

The bell will amost certainly be the original one and inscribed 'WHINHILL 1914'

Cheers Ron
 

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Diving the Wreck

Hi Mark

I don't really know, but I'd be surprised if no one does as she's nor too far out.
You could drop charter diving skipper James Holt an e-mail and see if he knows, because he operates in that area. [email protected]

Cheers Ron
 
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