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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Saw this on another thread. I had a think about this and cannot seem to remember any dive I have done during which I felt I needed more equipment, or different equipment, to do the dive (other than larger scooter, larger tanks etc).

I have dived in Florida a number of times and other than placing my argon bottle on my waistband, a few specific items in my pockets like DSMB, and wearing gloves I don't change anything for my UK ocean diving.

Andy
 

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Should there be a link Andy or is it just the statement.

If just the statement you know what them dam yank are like :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It was just a statement, in the 'curious' thread, but it isn't worth linking to it as nothing important was said in that thread.
 

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I know that it has been covered ad nauseum in other threads but i do consider the long hose to be unnescessary if diving in open water. I also believe that bright flourescent fins are better for the ocean than black ones.

However, that said, I am only just starting on the tech diving ladder and am willing to be convinced otherwise.:)

just my 2 beads worth.

keith
 

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I know that it has been covered ad nauseum in other threads but i do consider the long hose to be unnescessary if diving in open water.

However, that said, I am only just starting on the tech diving ladder and am willing to be convinced otherwise.:)
I think you will find the long hose very useful when you come to do your tech training as it gives you far more freedom to move about and solve issues with kit etc than a short hose.
 

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I think you will find the long hose very useful when you come to do your tech training as it gives you far more freedom to move about and solve issues with kit etc than a short hose.
really! When am i going to be that far away from my kit!


Please note: I am not trolling, this is a genuine search for knowledge.

Cheers in advance.
 

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aka Chimp 1 or Mavis...
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really! When am i going to be that far away from my kit!


Please note: I am not trolling, this is a genuine search for knowledge.

Cheers in advance.
Not your kit, your buddies! If you need to sort something out which he cannot reach, like some line on their fins, you will probably have a real trouble reaching that with a short hose.
 

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i think it could be said that the equipment config is overly prescriptive outside the florida caves. not wrong but for most diving outside any caves the exact position of the equipment is not really relevant.

I'm playing the naysmith here, so i'm coming at it from the angle of the general diver, who probably doesn't have a cue what DIR/GUE is.
 

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Not your kit, your buddies! If you need to sort something out which he cannot reach, like some line on their fins, you will probably have a real trouble reaching that with a short hose.
Ok, Makes sense, but surely such a scenario is just as likely during a recreational dive! Why don't we all have long hoses as standard ?
 

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I know that it has been covered ad nauseum in other threads but i do consider the long hose to be unnescessary if diving in open water. I also believe that bright flourescent fins are better for the ocean than black ones.

However, that said, I am only just starting on the tech diving ladder and am willing to be convinced otherwise.:)

just my 2 beads worth.

keith
I've had to use my long hose in open water, in a real gas sharing situation. It made life an awful lot easier than sharing using a short hose.

I agree it's not *necessary* but I think it's *desirable* - it's just so much easier to use when you need to. That's my experience anyway.

This was on a recreational, not a technical dive btw.

Fin colours- who cares if they're black? You are probably right about better visibility, and if jetfins came in yellow I might well buy those instead of black ones.

BTW I'm not DIR but I do use the gear you are talking about (which is also not 'DIR', DIR is just a diving system that incorporates use of that particular equipment set).
 

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Utrinque Paratus
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There is only one i can think of is that if you are doing a deep dive and the skipper wants you to send the blob up from the wreck then a spool isn't up for it unless you use two.

some people have used the pathfinder reel and sent the blob up on that so that is one way around it but its a pain reeling in on the pathfinder,

but as for the kit i don't see any difference in it from anywhere else in fact the configuration is very good and allot of divers (some Non DIR) use the hogarthian method like me.

Graham
 

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growing numbers of people do, actually - it might just be the kind of people I go diving around, but you do see lots of long hoses on UK south coast dive boats.
I agree, but none of the big training agencies seem to recommend them for OW divers, just wondered why not ?
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hi

A longhose can make things easier as you have more room and the reg isn't pulling out of the casualties mouth if there are any obstacles to overcome like line, etc.

There is also the possibility of wreck penetration and having to get out whilst sharing gas, even though you stated 'open water' and I understand where you are coming from, but the Thistlegorm, and Zenobia are popular dives for open water divers.

My open water single cylinder setup has a 5ft hose rather than the 7ft, and actually the way this is rigged up it is also a lot more tidy and streamlined than the usual clipped off to the shoulder dring 3ft octopus setup. If I wear a light canister then the 7ft is best.

Andy
 

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I agree, but none of the big training agencies seem to recommend them for OW divers, just wondered why not ?
AIUI, alot of the major training agencies teach to donate the octopus and not the reg you are breathing which is what you do with a long hose. I suppose it boils down to practice and confidence. Do you really want a diver who isn't particularily confident to donate their breathing supply to someone else and have, potentially, 2 OOA scenarios. If it was taught from the outset to donate from the mouth, then people might be more confident, but it might take a little longer.

Some of the BSAC, PADI, SAA instructors might want to comment on this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
There is only one i can think of is that if you are doing a deep dive and the skipper wants you to send the blob up from the wreck then a spool isn't up for it unless you use two.

some people have used the pathfinder reel and sent the blob up on that so that is one way around it but its a pain reeling in on the pathfinder

Graham
Spools are great for shorter distances and we use them for sending up SMB's from 21 mtrs or so. Below that then I have used a Pathfinder reel, with no problems so far. I would not use two spools, that seems like too much faffing to me for no benefit. I suppose the deepest I have done this from was the Illinois, and it is a pain reeling in the first 15 mtrs or so before the ascent is slowed, but I think this would be a pain with any reel, as reeling in at 10mtrs/min is not easy. If I need a reel then I take one, clipped to the butt dring, or clipped to the boltsnap on my 50% bottle, that way I have a better chance of seeing if any line starts spilling from it.

Andy
 

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Spools are great for shorter distances and we use them for sending up SMB's from 21 mtrs or so. Below that then I have used a Pathfinder reel, with no problems so far. I would not use two spools, that seems like too much faffing to me for no benefit. I suppose the deepest I have done this from was the Illinois, and it is a pain reeling in the first 15 mtrs or so before the ascent is slowed, but I think this would be a pain with any reel, as reeling in at 10mtrs/min is not easy. If I need a reel then I take one, clipped to the butt dring, or clipped to the boltsnap on my 50% bottle, that way I have a better chance of seeing if any line starts spilling from it.

Andy
I'd agree with this. I use a spool from 21, and a pathfinder from deeper. Two spools just strikes me as a disaster waiting to happen. I clip the reel to the butt D ring at the moment, but I do like the idea of clipping it to the 50% bottle, as you say it would be far easier to see if there was an issue with slack line. cheers for that, might have to try it out in the water.

with regards to the long hose issue, I like Mark Powell's approach to showing people why they are so useful. If someone turns up on a course with a short hose, an OOG drill with something else to sort out, like slack line retreival, or having to maintain stops whilst bagging up, soon shows people why they are a no brainer. He then runs the same drill with me or someone else donating from the long hose to show the difference. People generally go away and order one on the spot.They remove much of the stress of an OOG drill and just make sorting things out so much easier.

As for Florida, I've never been there, but I don't struggle with any of my kit these days, and can't think of anything to change to make easier. Our team is pretty ruthless in this respect. If we thought something was just a dumb idea, we'd have a hard time justifying to each other why we continue to use it. Works for us, I guess, but horses for courses.
 

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Spools are great for shorter distances and we use them for sending up SMB's from 21 mtrs or so. Below that then I have used a Pathfinder reel, with no problems so far. I would not use two spools, that seems like too much faffing to me for no benefit. I suppose the deepest I have done this from was the Illinois, and it is a pain reeling in the first 15 mtrs or so before the ascent is slowed, but I think this would be a pain with any reel, as reeling in at 10mtrs/min is not easy. If I need a reel then I take one, clipped to the butt dring, or clipped to the boltsnap on my 50% bottle, that way I have a better chance of seeing if any line starts spilling from it.

Andy
I now do the same; but since the work i did on DCI i have now slowed the acent rate right down and feel allot better for it, but that would be another thread

Graham
 

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I now do the same; but since the work i did on DCI i have now slowed the acent rate right down and feel allot better for it, but that would be another thread

Graham
Can you kick that one off on another thread Graham as I (and I think many others) would be very interested in your findings?

Regards
 

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I now do the same; but since the work i did on DCI i have now slowed the acent rate right down and feel allot better for it, but that would be another thread

Graham
I'm interested in this Graham. At the deeper portion of the ascent you are still ongassing, so that's why we boogie up at 9-10 metres per minute to the first stop as And says. Are you suggesting you slow down this portion of the ascent and feel better for it, as I don't understand this.

We certainly slow down the later portion of the ascents, down to 3m per minute in the intermediate stops, and 1m per minute in the shallows, and yes, that makes a hell of a difference to how you feel when you hit the surface.
 
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