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Ok, my name is Louise and I am a UK hardboat virgin.

There, now that's out in the open I feel alot better.

All my diving in the UK has been off RIBs where you either wander on kitted up or mostly kitted and finish off just before jumping in.  BCs and tanks sorted and fins etc in a bag.  

The question is, what d'ya do on a hardboat?

If we need to turn up with extra boxes etc bring the kit on board then I need to change a few things around, so being prepared I thought I would go straight to the horse as it were and try to avoid looking *too* much of a numpty in Anglesey!

Cheers all....
 

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Lou
You will love it, get on the boat with your dry suit on, some skippers won't sail without you zippered up. Spare tanks will be located somewhere on the boat, dependant on the boat start getting your kit together before you sail 'cos its easier
When you've gotten your BC, tank and regs rigged up, protect your 2nd stages and store the kit somewhere.
Before getting into the water someone (Bren are you there?) will sort the dive pairs and order out. Kit up, more importantly help the next pair into the water to kit up and off everyone goes. Luverly.
Dead easy and better than a RIB 4 me at least
 

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To be perfectly honest Lou, pretty much the same you do on a RIB only with more room and a warm cabin to heat up in. Take your kit on in a divebag/box, get ready to go, jump off, do dive(safely), climb back on dive ladder. The last bit is probably the most dangerous. Don't wait under someone climbing the ladder incase they fall on your head and when your climbing keep your reg in your mouth in case you fall. It can be tricky getting a fin on the first rung sometimes(depends on swell, rung position, etc) but when you get a foot up it's dead easy. Someone should help you get a, ahem, legover at the top.

Peter  
 

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Hi Lou,
 Peter just about beat me to it! His words of wisdom are pretty much on the mark.There is obviously some variation between hardboats - some are roomier than others.Different dive sites sometimes require different protocols - you don't really want to wear your drysuit all day , do you?
 Generally we like you to be here in time to load up and put your kit together, stow second tanks etc.Spare kit, dry-bags etc are then stowed down in the galley area- usually a normal kit-bag per diver ( some people like to bring their own plastic coffins- we're not impressed with these! )
Actual dive kit for the dive in a goody-bag as you would for a RIB (is there a "puke" emoticon?) dive.
For a short trip you can suit-up in dock too if you like but generally your comfier in your normal clothes where possible- you'll have ample warning of the impending dive and can normally suit -up down below.
Some people do find a dive ladder a problem- I don't see why - if you can stand up in your kit it shouldn't be a problem.Getting into the water can be done same as a rib-
just ensure any danglies are clutched away from the gunwhales ( bit you'll be sitting on at the time!) as there is an edge underneath which is a dangly-magnet. We generally straddle the gunwhale and do a a quarter twist to land tank (where's the puke emoticon again!)first. Gunwhale to water is about 2 ft so it's fairly easy whichever way you decide.
 Having said all that you could be on Scott's boat which is totally different!:wink:
 Bring plenty of pies!
 All the best,
               Terry


 
 

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Cheers for the help all.  Done hardboat in Melbourne in and Red Sea so ladders, entries etc are fine but obviously in the Red Sea your kit stays there and you are provided with the boxes so no concerns and in Aus you went out for one dive so were kitted up a la rib dive.

So no plastic coffins.....####. ;)

Cheers

Lou
 

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My advice is speak to the skipper and do what he tells you to do.

I use hardboats quite a lot and much prefer them to ribs but if people are inconsiderate then they can be difficult.

Only take what you need on board, listen carefully to the access/agress procedures, keep you kit stowed safely and have fun.

One final thing make sure you put your hood on after you've listen to the pre-dive briefing.
 

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Bearing in mind that there might be up to ten folks on the boat at any one given time, I like to take a minimalist approach to the stuff I take aboard a dive boat.

I kit up (dry-bag, twins, gloves etc. as if I'm about to dive) with everthing except my fins, hood and mask, which I carry with me to the boat. I then hand over/lower down the fins, mask and hood to someone on the boat.

Then I either get onto the boat or climb-down the harbour ladder, which may be the case in Anglesey depending on which harbour you're diving out of (Amlych or Menai) and the state of the tide. I then find a seat and stay there until I've heard the dive briefing and then put my hood, mask and fins on ready for the dive - which invloves getting up, walking to the ladder/drop-off point and then getting in to the water.

The only extras I might carry (thanks Stevie Walker for the 'dry box' in Abbs) with me are my **** and glasses.

Now bear in mind that some folk may not want to climb down a harbour ladder in full rig & webbing, so I advise that you carry your kit to the embarkation point, take it off, and then any hard-boat will have a 'hook-line' on which you can lower your kit down (twins/BCs included) to waiting hands on the boat. This process can be repeated in reverse after a dive when your kit needs lifting back ashore.

Hope this helps.
 

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Ooooh, now I am getting confused.  Bren, you are saying summat totally different to Terry (who should know!!)

I guess I will come prepared for all eventualities and we can agree a concensus the night before.  Shan't be doing any hardboat diving before then....unless Stoney make some serious changes, that is.
 

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No need to be confused Lou.

Let's face it, you can turn up at a RIB or hard boat in precisely the manner I describe - it makes not a jot of difference whether you do a backward-roll off the side or a giant-stride entry into the Oggin does it?

The only difference may be whether you climb straight aboard RIB or boat (with or without kit) or whether you climb down a harbour ladder (with or without kit). Where's the confusion?

(Edited by Bren Tierney at 12:44 pm on Feb. 3, 2003)
 

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Bren, the confusion was over the suit-wearing etc.  It isn't a big deal.  All the rest is quite clear and I have not a worry at all about getting into or out of the boat - either at shore side or the big blue (grey? Green?).

My intial concern was how kitted up I should be, and what storage I needed to take on board (bag? box? goodie bag?).  Seeing as we have the skipper of at least one of the boats we plan to use it seemed prudent to ask direct!  

My confusion was that you repeated to wear a drysuit after Terry had said to turn up for his boat (at least) in normal clothes and we can suit up nearer the site and below decks.

Anyway....it'll all come out in the wash.

Lou
 

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Hi Lou,

That's why I advocate taking next to nothing other than that with which you intend to dive. Goodie bags and the like are surplus to requirement (for me any way)- there will be hot food/soup etc. on the boat. And you can put glasses and **** etc. with skipper in the wheelhouse if you don't have a dry box.

The skipper couldn't care if you turned up tooled-up like a member of Shaky Boats or in your civvies and needing to get kitted later (although bear in mind Terry's comments about the large plastic kit boxes - as with any boat, there will only be a finite amount of room, and these boxes can and do get in the way when divers are kitting up and they need stowing); what Terry gave was a suggestion, not an instruction - my point was that if you're already good-to-go in your kit then you can sit there quite happily (warm and dry) if others feel the need to get kitted up on the boat.

The other benefit of the above approach is that by you being ready to rock, you cut down on the general 'arseholes-n-elbows' session when others are asking: "Where's my fins? Has anyone seen my mask?" etc.

What I advocate is designed to help, low maintenance, makes sense and simply cuts down on the number of steps it takes from you coming aboard to getting in the sea.

And, if the boat jouney is a longish one, you can come out of your kit - if you so wish - peel it down to you waist and then re-kit at the appropriate time, but at least you're half way there rather than starting from scratch.

Hope it helps.

Cheers,
 
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