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A huge member
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i have photos of my holiday on my xd card but the card is not reading is there any way i can get them off :angry:
 

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aka Chimp 1 or Mavis...
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10,108 Posts
Is the card not reading in the card reader or through the camera?

If the reader, try another!

If the camera, mmmm.

If you can view the images on the camera, can you connect the camera to the PC/Mac and detect the card that way as an external drive in Windows Explorer (or the Mac equivalent?)

If you can see them in Explorer, just copy them to somewhere on your hard drive and go from there.

Or can you see the files but can't open them?

Many questions, any answers? :D
 

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A huge member
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423 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
right it wont work in the reader and it wont work in the camera on the camera it says card not intialized when i plug it into the pc its just a blank space
 

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aka Chimp 1 or Mavis...
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10,108 Posts
Oh dear.

Sorry, I can't recommend anything else other than try another card reader$. If the camera doesn't read the card that is a bad sign.

Anyone else have any bright ideas?
 

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So raise your hand if you think that was a Russian
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11,158 Posts
I had this once and was pointed to a utility for floppy disks, but I'm b8ggered if I can rememebr what it was - I'm 99% sure that it was called 'disk doctor' there is/was a free trial where it would tell you if it could 'see' yout pics on the card/disk and then you coulf pay $30 to licence it.

r
Paul
 

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Registered
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5,235 Posts
I had a similar problem (windows claimed the card was unformatted) this weekend after flooding my Olympus :angry: and used a specialist piece of software to recover the images from this card
.

PM me if you want details and I can get them from home.
 

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Likes to play his bongo's in the morning
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1,286 Posts
pm stuartc I'm sure he has something for this
bosh, here ya go, all the details here...
http://www.yorkshire-divers.com/for...-needed-my-pictures-have-gone.html#post625860

If the card isn't reading then this data recovery software may not get very far since hardware isn't detecting the card.

Have you tried inspecting the contacts on the card and the casing of the card for any physical faults such as cracks or separation?

If the card looks intact, and the contacts are accessible, is it possible to try cleaning them with a pencil eraser? (improves the quality of the contact)
 

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aka Chimp 1 or Mavis...
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10,108 Posts
If the card isn't reading then this data recovery software may not get very far since hardware isn't detecting the card.
This was my initial thought, let us know how you get on.

Regards
 

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Mark W
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4,887 Posts
A little bit more detail might be useful at this juncture.

Usually what happens is that the file allocation table gets corrupted. Can happen if the card's not been formatted correctly before use (ALL cards should be formatted in the camera they're going to be used in before they're used)

I'm sad to say the xD cards suffer from this more than most. If you turn off your camera before it's finished writing the file it might not have written the FAT update onto the card before you turned it off, or even the FAT update didn't take at all. I have to be careful on my DSLR with this being olympus (albeit using CompactFlash).

Most of these are FAT32 or FAT16 formatted cards in cameras - the FAT standing for 'File Allocation Table' with the number at the end referring to the number of bits the FAT table can address - thus giving you the 'rule of thumb' 2Gb limitation for FAT16 and the FAT32 limitation is 8 terabytes, however, it's all dependent on cluster size as the limitation is to do with number of clusters. Ouch. My brain hurts.

Anyway, deep techies aside, this is like the sector or block index for the card, referencing filenames to physical block start and end locations. Hard disks and Floppy Disks have the same File Allocation Tables (albeit slightly different for NTFS for XP or HFS+ in the case of Mac OSx)

When you delete a file, all it does is erase it's entry in the file allocation table as being available for writing. It doesn't overwrite the file. Thus using an undelete program it can see these 'deleted' files and even scan the drive for start and end markers and scan the files to make sure they're whole.

So, the bottom line is that it all depends what happens when you insert the card into the PC.

If it detects the card but says it's finding no data or has an error, there is a fairly good chance that something like RescuePro will work.

If it does bugger all on the PC when you insert the card (nothing shows in the System/Hardware tree or your card reader doesn't flash), then the card is more than likely cream crackered and you're unlikely to get anything back from it.

Mark (who used to use Gibson Research's Spinrite back in the day when Dos was the dominant OS!)
 

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Bantam talks a lot of sense however, it is not necessarily so that if the card cannot be detected in Windows it cannot be read. Windows - especially explorer - is very intolerant of failure and will give up with a variety of error messages very quickly.

Using a piece of recovery software - there's loads out there, some of them for free - reads the card in a different way (bypassing the well described FAT table) and thus gets the data.

Windows reported my card as either unformatted or not inserted. My wife's Olympus could read the card and display the pictures but Windows couldn't read them from the camera. The recovery software worked a treat and recovered all the photos as well long deleted ones. It took ages to work though.
 

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Likes to play his bongo's in the morning
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1,286 Posts
Give the one I linked a try, it'll scan the hardware (assuming it can see it) and recommend writing an image backup file to another media (such as your PC Hard drive), so that you can work from this rather than the original source.

It also speeds up subsequent work on the data as it doesn't need to re-scan the media to get to the bits you want to extract.

Depending upon how big your source device is will determine how long the scan takes.

It then shows the % success it estimates for recovery of the files it finds. If you've not subsequently written data after "deleting" something (which only removes the location data from the FAT as per Bantam's post) then you'll be looking at a very high probability of a successful recovery/undeletion.

The trial version of this software allows you to undelete/recover 1 file in any 24 hour period, so you can get an idea of whether it's worth paying the 20 quid licence for unlimited undeletes.

Memory cards and USB sticks are quite prone to problems resulting from power surges or shutdown without completing the write task etc, so they're best backed up often.

Good luck, although if neither the camera nor the card reader are getting anything then the data recovery tools may not get very far

fingers crossed.
 

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Mark W
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4,887 Posts
Bantam talks a lot of sense however, it is not necessarily so that if the card cannot be detected in Windows it cannot be read. Windows - especially explorer - is very intolerant of failure and will give up with a variety of error messages very quickly.
Eh?

Maybe I wasn't that clear (although re-reading my post I did say it).

I wasn't talking about Windows Explorer at all. I was more talking about the PC detecting the physical card. Whether or not it appears as a drive or even as a device, if the machine sees that *something* is connected (even if it's just an exclamation mark in device manager) then you'll probably be able to get something back.
 
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