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I have managed so far with Specsavers mask(cheap in case I couldn't dive for any reason) single vision lenses, but despite being v. good for money, they have limited vision correction, and my normal prescription is for varifocals.  As I have been well and truly hooked, I now am looking to get a decent mask and have better lenses. I need some sort of bifocal lens, ( dont think they can do varifocal) so I can focus better on close things (buddy's slate for one thing if nec.).  Anyone have any experiences/advice to share, or recommendations for suppliers.

Many thanks
 

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Hi Kathy,

guess this maybe a really daft question as I don't know much about varifocals (actually make that 'I know nothing').  Anyway, do you have a prescription for contacts?  If so then wear those with a normal mask.

I feel as I'm writting this that that is not the answer.
 

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Thanks Timing,
Contacts had crossed my mind as I know people do dive with them.  Having said that dont think contacts would work because of the need for varifocals.  I need to have a different prescription to see close things (reading etc) to looking into the distance (normal correction) (something to do with my advancing years!!) and contacts would only be one prescription.  Varifocals graduate from the top of the lens to the bottom to allow me to look down (through the bottom part) to read etc and through the middle for normal distance.  Bifocals are similar but have two separate prescriptions and are usually more obvious as they have a line across the lens where the prescription changes.  I have heard that if you have bifocal lenses while diving, because of the angle you swim at (horizontal rather than upright when walking) the line across can spoil your vision.

Sorry long reply, and thanks again for taking the trouble to respond!
:glasses: :smile:
 

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Kathie
Try SDS watersports or Diverswarehouse they both do perscription lenses, I also saw a bloke when I was on holiday who had an entire lens that clipped inside a standard mask. I'll see if any of those who I have email addresses for know his telephone number. It would mean you can change the mask without paying again
 

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Hi there Kathy,

If you would consider using contacts for diving there is no reason why you can't fulfil your optical requirements with contacts.  There are three possibilities for you to consider; one is a system known as monovision in which you have your reading Rx in one eye and your distance Rx in the other.  This may sound a bit odd but is very sucessful and works well, the only drawback is that your stereopsis is neutralised.  The others are the wearing of either bifocal or varifocal contact lenses.  Acuvue from J&J produce contacts as bifocals.  Progressive lenses are produced by a few companies and are also available as daily disposables.

If you have any questions about these lenses pop to your local opticians or if you want drop me an e-mail

HTH

Ian Daly
 

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Hey Kathie,

Found myself in a very similar situation about two years ago: sick and tired of getting up in the morning - after a night on the sherry whilst on tour - and having to fanny about with contact lenses. Change out of glasses, into lenses, then have pair, one, non-presciption sunglasses to cut out the glare of the sun, then get on the boat, stow sunglasses, put on clear mask, remove lenses immediately after dive as they get dry in my eyes, revert to own glasses at night whilst having prescription sunglasses by day whilst not on dive boat............ARSE!!

So, called these guys (found them in 'Diver Mag') and got my life in order. I called them on the Monday, had the mask (to my exact prescription) in my hand on the Thursday - top service and they know their stuff big time!!

The good thing is that they're all divers who just happen to be opticians to boot!! What a combo eh??

Any way, here's the gravy:

diveoptix.com Limited
Unit 2B The Seebed Centre
Langston Road
Loughton
Essex
IG10 3TQ

TEL: 0800 956 2625
FAX: 0208 787 7033

[email protected]

"All our consultants are PADI certified divers & qualified and registered UK dispensing opticians'

http://www.diveoptix.com

I can recommend them in a big way. Range of masks and manufacturers. Hope this helps.

Cheers,
 

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I was going to suggest SDS watersports, as I understand it theres two methods with the prescription lens thing. Theres the one where you have individual lenses fitted in the mask,I know theres quite a few do those. If I remember correctly there are some firms that actually have the choice of lenses bonded to the glass, a bit more expensive.

On the contact lens thing, I find the daily disposables fit the bill, ( it was getting a dear do one drifting off at £20 a throw) on a mask clear, keep me eyes closed when clearing now.  
 

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Contact lenses are a life saver for me. I use daily disposal lenses for all the sports I teach. I can swim, clear a mask, all in the open water with my my eyes open! If you buy in bulk the cost comes down to less than 50p per pair. Because i am in water most days, I remove my lenses early evening.  I also have a quarterly eye health check up (which is included in the cost of the lenes).
 

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I'm shortsighted in a rather noticeable way. During my early dives, I never felt this to be a handicap - the slight improvement brought about by water/air diffraction helped a little, of course.
Then I went to the Red Sea.
After a week of looking at wonderful, brightly-coloured blurs, I came home and got hold of a prescription mask. I'd been able to cope without in my low-vis dives, but really felt the loss in the better quality waters.
I've dived with it ever since, but I'm considering putting the plain non-prescription lenses back into the mask and switching to daily disposable lenses. The faff factor just isn't reduced enough by the mask, and I carry a spare mask with me as well: As all my sea diving is off a rib, my basic routine is - Drive to dive site in normal glasses. Remove glasses, put on old pair that I won't mind loosing too much. Get on rib, go to dive site. Remove glasses, put in safe place (Ha!) Finish kitting up squinting. Put on mask.
You get the idea..
But since my current lenses are gas permeable, I don't want to risk diving with them - they're expensive. So, when I get the time and money (Ha!) I intend to get hold of daily disposables, and wear them from start to finish of a dive trip.
 

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Thanks all - I certainly have plenty of ideas.  I like the idea of disposable contacts - just the cost/availability of having them with variable prescription - I think they have to be weighted slightly to keep them in the right place - so they may not be practical.  I could also use my current mask for times when I know I am going to have to do a "voluntary" mask removal.  

The stories of the change from glasses/sunglasses/to mask/to contacts etc. etc. struck a chord.  I did my first sea dive off Penzance a couple of months back in very choppy sea.  I don't get sea sick, but as soon as I took my glasses off to change to mask in conditions where you couldnt stand up and the world became a blur, that was it!!!  Another vote for contacts I suppose.  Didnt put me off - still think its best thing ever!

Thanks again.
Kathie
 

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Kathie,

Before you try progressive (varifocal) contacts ask your optician for a trial of monovision - this trial should be free.  If this is successful don't bother trialing the varifocal contacts as they will much more expensive, unless the drop in steropsis is a problem.  As for progressive lenses they do not need to be weighted in place as the are not designed the same as progressive spectacle lenses; which have the distance Rx at the top then a progressive corridor down to a reading Rx, progressive contacts have concentric rings of focus - like an archery target, I beleive that distance is in the middle, intermediate around that and then near vision around the periphery.  Thus if the lens does spin it will not make any difference to your vision.  My father is a football coach and is running around like an idiot all day and loves his progressive contacts.

HTH

Ian Daly

(Edited by Ian Daly at 10:01 pm on Dec. 10, 2002)
 
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