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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've only seen one or two integral octopuses on BCDs but was wondering about the pros and cons.
I decided on a new BCD, Sea Quest Diva LX, and noticed they offered an integral octopus as an optional extra, however, I've been told this isn't available to UK purchasers as it doesn't have the kite mark. I'm rather sold on Sea Quests's new Sure Lock system for the weights, and so may go for the "normal" Diva LX anyway, but I'd be interested in people's views of the integrated second air.
 

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Personally, I'd never get one.

I'd much rather have a normal octopus. If your buddy had a problem and needed to share air with you, they would have to use your primary DV, which I'd hazzard a guess would be a standard length hose, leaving you with the autoair type thing.

On a short hose.

With your inflate/deflate controls now attached to the DV you're breathing from instead of being in a postion you're familiar with.

I can't imagine this as being the best way to control an already stressful situation.

Just my opinion...:)
 

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I learnt to dive with one on my zeagle wing, and never found it a problem. Horses for courses.
 

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Likes to play his bongo's in the morning
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you'll get lots of opinions for and against just about any bit of kit you care to mention on here!

the best advice I've seen is to be clear about what your expected requirements are for now and for a short distance into the future. An economy purchase now may end up costing more in the long run anyway.

Don't completely rule things out without getting opinions as you're doing here.

Against:
lots of folks on here say they freeflow, and have had trouble with them
they add to the weight of the BC for travel
it's something else to go wrong and has the cost of servicing
most buddies would expect to find your regulator configured with an octopus, so if you go for this as well, then you have the flexibility and redundancy, but you've also got the increased maintenance cost and potential failure points.

For:
I've not had any trouble with my Buddy/AP Valves one, (although I've now swapped out for a standard inflator for travel weight)
They provide more gas options, especially if your panicked out of air diver goes straight for the regulator they can see working (i.e. the one that was in your gob a couple of seconds ago...) In this scenario your auto-air is exactly where you know it is, rather than having to grab your octopus and then ensure the hoses aren't wrapped around your console etc (and I know a buddy check would sort that)

However, if redundancy is a concern then you'd probably be better planning to add a pony and separate regs at a future date. (i.e. get used to single-tank diving with standard regulator/octopus, then add pony for total gas and regulator redundancy)

you could go for regs without an octopus, and this may have a net reduction in total weight if you're concerned about the weight for travel purposes.


I suspect auto-air regulators were more popular before octopus 2nd stage regulators became the de facto standard.
 

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All hail the mighty ZOM
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IMHO- bobbins. Avoind like the plague. They get abused, not serviced and leak when you don't want them to. On a single rig either use a standard octopus on the left hip or necklace a backup reg and have a long hose primary. Inflator's for inflating, not breathing.

And the AP one sounds like a great idea when it automatically switches to breathe from the jacket when the air runs out. But then you just get a gobfull of water and drown.

Whoop dee fcuking whooooooo :D
 

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Nigel Hewitt
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And the AP one sounds like a great idea when it automatically switches to breathe from the jacket when the air runs out. But then you just get a gobfull of water and drown.
Yes...
I have one on the rebreather because it came as standard but the 'breath the jacket' feature does, as Woz points out, mean that as it seamlessly switches from breathing the tank to breathing the jacket so that if that tank runs out you only know when you have exhaled the last of your buoyancy.
You are now as negative as you can get and out of anything to breath. Your bad day just got seriously worse.

I've kept it because I'm used to it as a wing filler/dumper but it forms no part of my breathing plans. The adjustments set it to a heavy breathe so it doesn't free flow (anymore) and one day, when everything else breaks, I might be thankful for it.

I really couldn't see me recommending anybody to pay extra for one over a normal inflater.
 
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