YD Scuba Diving Forums banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,914 Posts
Imported post

Bit hard to say, got any more photos ? A buddy of mine who dived in the Med for 3 years (for his PhD) saw a fair few Tarpon, these can be 2-6f eet long, all silver, big scales very impressive beasties
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,314 Posts
Imported post

[b said:
Quote[/b] (Steve W @ July 15 2003,18:23)]Bit hard to say, got any more photos ? A buddy of mine who dived in the Med for 3 years (for his PhD) saw a fair few Tarpon, these can be 2-6f eet long, all silver, big scales very impressive beasties
They don't look anything like tarpon to me. At least, not this species:
http://ichtyonb1.mnhn.fr/Photos....species
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
377 Posts
Imported post

Maybe a Dentex or a Sea Bream, Couch's or Gilt Head. Will try & have a look elsewhere & get back.???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,240 Posts
Imported post

They look like shoaling/schooling Big Eyed Jacks to me - the type you see at any reef in the Tiran Straits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,914 Posts
Imported post

Agreed John (good link BTW), but the photo doesn't really give you masses of info to judge accurately
THey look like they've go a single elongated dorsal fin (like a Ling), is that right Justin?
TBH, The fish on the right reminded me a little of a
Dolphin fish
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,314 Posts
Imported post

I agree about the single elongated dorsal fin, Steve, but the caudal fin is definitely not that of a dolphin fish and the general shape of the body doesn't resemble the very characteristic shape of the dolphin fish either. If we're right about the dorsal fin, they are definitely not jacks either, Bren. Sorry to be so negative. I've no idea what they are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,966 Posts
Imported post

<font color='#0000FF'>Agree with you there John, I've been going through my book for the last couple of days and can tell what it isn't, unfortunately not what it is! I'll keep looking especially through other fish ID's, actually may ask my Mrs, shes much better than me with this!
 

·
Finless: You couldn't invent him...
Joined
·
23,946 Posts
Imported post

I think they are cod in disguise.

That would explain why I never see any when diving anymore because they have left for warmer climes where there is less attention from big trawlers.

OK, you don't agree. How about a guppy that was buried down the loo, recovered, mutated and is now living happily everafter .....

Yes, I am incredibly bored at work.
 

·
That's Members Representative to you!
Joined
·
2,416 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Imported post

From the pics it looks like a single long dorsal fin - i can't be 100% though - there was so much to look at and I was keeping my eyes peeled for groupers and sharks...

Apparently they had big canine teeth - which led me to believe Dentex, but i'm not sure because of the shape of the head... The closest match is one of the sea breams out of my book, but the sizes don't match up...

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,314 Posts
Imported post

[b said:
Quote[/b] (Justin Owen @ July 17 2003,18:16)]From the pics it looks like a single long dorsal fin - i can't be 100% though - there was so much to look at and I was keeping my eyes peeled for groupers and sharks...

Apparently they had big canine teeth - which led me to believe Dentex, but i'm not sure because of the shape of the head... The closest match is one of the sea breams out of my book, but the sizes don't match up...

Nor does the caudal fin!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,240 Posts
Imported post

Yellow-lipped Emperor Fish (Lethrinus xanthochilus)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,773 Posts
Imported post

<font color='#000080'>Lethrinus  xanthochilus  Klunzinger, 1870    
Family:  Lethrinidae (Emperors or scavengers), subfamily: Lethrininae  picture (Lexan_u2.jpg) by Randall, J.E.

Map  
Order:  Perciformes  
Class:  Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
FishBase  name: Yellowlip emperor
Max. size:  70.0 cm FL (male/unsexed; Ref. 40637); max. published weight: 5,440 g (Ref. 40637)
Environment:  reef-associated; non-migratory; marine ; depth range - 150 m  
Climate: tropical; 25°N - 33°S
Importance:  fisheries: commercial; gamefish: yes
Resilience:  Low, minimum population doubling time 4.5 - 14 years (K=0.14-0.30)
Distribution:  
Gazetteer  Indo-Pacific: Red Sea, East Africa, central Indian Ocean and Indonesia to the Ryukyu Islands, the Caroline Islands, New Caledonia, Vanuatu and to the Marquesas.
Diagnosis:  Dorsal spines (total): 10-10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9-9; Anal spines: 3-3; Anal soft rays: 8-8. Body is yellowish gray with scattered irregular dark spots; lips yellowish, the upper lip more intense; a red spot at upper base of the pectoral fin. The fins are bluish grey and mottled, the bases of the fins are lighter and the edges of the dorsal and caudal fins are reddish.  
Biology:  Occurs in small groups over seagrass beds, sand and rubble areas of coral reefs, deep channels, and lagoons. Usually found in shallow water. Feeds mainly on crustaceans, fishes, and echinoderms.
Red List Status: Not in IUCN Red List  , (Ref. 36508)  
Dangerous:  harmless  
Coordinator:  
Main Ref:  Carpenter, K.E. and G.R. Allen. 1989. (Ref. 2295)  

 I don`t think so
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
377 Posts
Imported post

Have e-mailed the pic to friends in Tenerife, Island Divers, to see if the owner Graham knows.
Will get back if I get an answer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,314 Posts
Imported post

[b said:
Quote[/b] (Scuba1 @ July 17 2003,20:37)]Lethrinus  xanthochilus  Klunzinger, 1870    
Family:  Lethrinidae (Emperors or scavengers), subfamily: Lethrininae  picture (Lexan_u2.jpg) by Randall, J.E.

Map  
Order:  Perciformes  
Class:  Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
FishBase  name: Yellowlip emperor
Max. size:  70.0 cm FL (male/unsexed; Ref. 40637); max. published weight: 5,440 g (Ref. 40637)
Environment:  reef-associated; non-migratory; marine ; depth range - 150 m  
Climate: tropical; 25°N - 33°S
Importance:  fisheries: commercial; gamefish: yes
Resilience:  Low, minimum population doubling time 4.5 - 14 years (K=0.14-0.30)
Distribution:  
Gazetteer  Indo-Pacific: Red Sea, East Africa, central Indian Ocean and Indonesia to the Ryukyu Islands, the Caroline Islands, New Caledonia, Vanuatu and to the Marquesas.
Diagnosis:  Dorsal spines (total): 10-10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9-9; Anal spines: 3-3; Anal soft rays: 8-8. Body is yellowish gray with scattered irregular dark spots; lips yellowish, the upper lip more intense; a red spot at upper base of the pectoral fin. The fins are bluish grey and mottled, the bases of the fins are lighter and the edges of the dorsal and caudal fins are reddish.  
Biology:  Occurs in small groups over seagrass beds, sand and rubble areas of coral reefs, deep channels, and lagoons. Usually found in shallow water. Feeds mainly on crustaceans, fishes, and echinoderms.
Red List Status: Not in IUCN Red List  , (Ref. 36508)  
Dangerous:  harmless  
Coordinator:  
Main Ref:  Carpenter, K.E. and G.R. Allen. 1989. (Ref. 2295)  

 I don`t think so
The distribution is wrong (no mention of the Med) but the picture looks about right:
http://www.fishbase.org/Photos....species
Could it be a related species?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
377 Posts
Imported post

Okey Dokey!

Here it is guys n gals!!

A DENTEX.
 

·
That's Members Representative to you!
Joined
·
2,416 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Imported post

Cheers Chris, was led to believe thats what they were but i'm b*ggered if I can find a pic that matches up with them - though there are a fair few species...

The pic of the emperor fish wasn't far off, but the angle of the forehead is a bit steeper on the fish I saw.

Chris, do your friends at Island Divers have any other pics they could email? Also - I'm off to tenerife in November - do you have their email/web address so I can get some diving arranged...  


Thanks all!!
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top