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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I had to look around but this seemed the most likely forum for this kind of topic. If there's somewhere better, please feel free to move it....I'm still feeling my way around here.

OK. Mostly, AFAIK, we're all taught to primarily dive in buddy pairs so that if one person gets in trouble the other can hopefully haul them out of it. Ok....I know there's a lot of solo divers out there too, but they dive their own self sufficient, equipment redundant, procedures if they have any sense.
Now last year I gave up smoking for medical reasons and subsequently have gained a whole lot of weight - maybe 60lbs (although I need to cut down the beer and drop some of that!) The thing is though that I often dive with my wife, who is a rather small Japanese lady now about half my weight. It has occurred to me recently that if something happened and she had to try and haul me out of the water we'd have a problem. It's making me rethink the whole advisability of simply diving alone with her - I hate to put her into a situation that she couldn't handle, and wasn't the cause of to start with.

What do you guys think about this? Any answers? Things to consider that might equal the balance somewhat? (yeah...OK....lose some weight!) Thinking about it I've often seen big guys dive with small wives and never really thought about it until now. Except for an air-share or so it's not exactly a fully capable buddy though, is it?

Thoughts?
 

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YDs Most Southerly Monkey
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I had to look around but this seemed the most likely forum for this kind of topic. If there's somewhere better, please feel free to move it....I'm still feeling my way around here.

OK. Mostly, AFAIK, we're all taught to primarily dive in buddy pairs so that if one person gets in trouble the other can hopefully haul them out of it. Ok....I know there's a lot of solo divers out there too, but they dive their own self sufficient, equipment redundant, procedures if they have any sense.
Now last year I gave up smoking for medical reasons and subsequently have gained a whole lot of weight - maybe 60lbs (although I need to cut down the beer and drop some of that!) The thing is though that I often dive with my wife, who is a rather small Japanese lady now about half my weight. It has occurred to me recently that if something happened and she had to try and haul me out of the water we'd have a problem. It's making me rethink the whole advisability of simply diving alone with her - I hate to put her into a situation that she couldn't handle, and wasn't the cause of to start with.

What do you guys think about this? Any answers? Things to consider that might equal the balance somewhat? (yeah...OK....lose some weight!) Thinking about it I've often seen big guys dive with small wives and never really thought about it until now. Except for an air-share or so it's not exactly a fully capable buddy though, is it?

Thoughts?
When I did my BSAC training 1979-80, my then 17 yr old girlfriend (now wife) trained at the same time. Back then, she was maybe 7 & a half stone.

A large part of the pool training involved rescue, which included landing the casualty, ie pulling them, out of the pool, which simulated landing the casualty into an iinflatable or RHIB.

She was paired up for this, quite deliberately by the TO with a big strong lad, probably 6" 2', rugby player, athlete etc. Now she naturally quite enjoyed this and I had to keep a close eye on things, but she was obviously in a bit of a spot (you'd think) when it came to lifting him out of the pool and onto the side.

Instead, no real problems; in the water for the rescue tow, he was pretty well weightless; getting him out of the water, using the bouncing technique was also very effective although to make sure she did it properly, this was somewhat exaggerated to the extent that his head went under a couple of times. We were all quite surprised how, with the correct technique, it was so much easier than expected.

Mind you, she did drop him on his head on the concrete pool side but at least he didn't drown.

Has she done Rescue?
 

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I don't know what your usual diving routine is so this is just a general ramble that may or may not be relevant to your situation (I also may be talking bo%%ocks, but that has never stopped anyone else ;) :D :D ) ...

Most of the time there is usally more than just the two divers. If shore diving there is usually shore cover and when diving from boats there is the skipper and often, but not always, a crew member. So if there's a problem the key part a buddy can play is to get you to the surface, in which the difference in size should make no difference - it's your BCD/wing/Dry suit/ABLJ/etc giving the lift.

Once on the surface, the surface cover/boat crew can assist in hauling your arse out of the water, or (as long as you're still breathing) your buddy can keep you afloat until either any other divers surface or attract attention and again provide assistance.

As with all diving procedures the critical part is to practise all relevent skills, if the time that you need the skill is the first time you've done it then there is all the more chance that it will go all pear shaped!

Ok, ramble over - time for me to go to sleep :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've always suspected that BSAC training was a bit more intensive than PADI from the get go. Isn't it similar to CMAS? But no, my wife hasn't done rescue - she thinks she's too small to do it!

Normally it's true though that there are other people about so it's not an issue, especially if it's something like guided dives from boats. We do dive locally though on our own where there is no support. There might be other divers on the beach, but not always. It's a very easy site though - actually I solo dive there as well so I suppose it shouldn't really make much difference. Even so though......small and diminutive in Japan is virtually a child in Europe! I couldn't believe it when I first came here and saw mothers bringing their kids to school. The mothers all looked as if they were about 14 years old....really weird feeling! :teeth:

Yes.....I'll have to get her into practicing a few techniques for just in case. We always dive with SMBs or lift bags so I'm sure we can work out a plan. :teeth:
 

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"Three sheds"
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As others have said, landing a casualty on a shelving beach is much easier if you with the proper technique, and I've been "rescued" by some of the smallest people in our club.

However, a steep bank (or the side of a boat) is much harder, and even if the buddies are of a similar size you really need someone on the shore to help. Although this isn't too much of an issue with a boat, as someone must be driving it.

Janos
 

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no one is really to small

I've always suspected that BSAC training was a bit more intensive than PADI from the get go. Isn't it similar to CMAS? But no, my wife hasn't done rescue - she thinks she's too small to do it. :teeth:
To be honest old mate if your able to dive then your not to small to do rescue bodies in water really weigh very little so it's purley techneque. you really ought to just enrol her on the padi rescue at least to give her a fighting chance.
Attaching you to a lift bag is probably not a good Idia. It will just create more confusion in the seperation of the two of you. as for the extra weight then yes best you loose it as it'll at least give your hart a chance.

Go on do your wife a favour loose the weight and get her to do the rescue course she'll enjoy it really. Oh and she'll probably be really proud of you making the effort to loose the exesss. :teeth:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Attaching you to a lift bag is probably not a good Idia. It will just create more confusion in the seperation of the two of you.
LOL....actually that was a little tongue in cheek. I'm not really planning on letting her pop me from 30m to the surface! :) I might let her do a rescue course if I can get her into it.
 

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YDs Most Southerly Monkey
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LOL....actually that was a little tongue in cheek. I'm not really planning on letting her pop me from 30m to the surface! :)
You might not be, but how's she gonna claim the insurance otherwise?
 

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To be honest old mate if your able to dive then your not to small to do rescue bodies in water really weigh very little so it's purley techneque. you really ought to just enrol her on the padi rescue at least to give her a fighting chance.
Attaching you to a lift bag is probably not a good Idia. It will just create more confusion in the seperation of the two of you. as for the extra weight then yes best you loose it as it'll at least give your hart a chance.

Go on do your wife a favour loose the weight and get her to do the rescue course she'll enjoy it really. Oh and she'll probably be really proud of you making the effort to loose the exesss. :teeth:
I'll second that and the RD course is good fun, bit also with a serious side on teaching you techniques (see, size DOESN'T matter!).

As from personal experience, I've done practise and real 'rescues', largest one was a gentleman nearly a foot taller than myself, and so long I knew how to apply the techniques, I had confidence in myself.

It may then be a good idea to do the RD course and then when on dives, practise some of these techniques, as you will never know when they are needed.

HTH's,
Lou
 

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Another vote for the Rescue Diver Course. My regular buddy is 6'8" and probably weighs nearly twice as much as I do (I'm 5'2"). We started diving together after doing the RD course. It was lots of fun but tought me a lot at the same time. With such a size difference it was a challenge but I managed.

HTH

Helen x
 

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Adrenaline boost

Kim, if ever there was a problem and your wife had to muscle you onto the beach, she would find the strength. In emergency situations our brains pump adrenaline into the blood stream, giving us resources we don't normally have.

The thing about an adrenaline dump, though, is that it often it provokes an odd focus involving a sort of tunnel vision, but at the same time a lack of focus in that it becomes difficult to think clearly. The instinct is simply to react. A rescue course would give your wife tools she could during a crisis use without having to think things through; she could simply fall back on her training, use her adrenaline-induced strength and speed, and save you!
 

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Got me thinking

Hi there, the thread got me thinking to the plans i have for me and my son during the summer. He is 11 yrs old and i am the lardy 6ft rugby player. He passed his open water last year with me in Egypt but on our subsequent dives we always had a guide to ourselves , cos everyone else tottered off to 30m whereby we shadowed them at 12m . I plan to introduce him to a local lake ( Ellerton max 12m ) and maybe Capenwray but after reading the above thread i think i had better find someone willing to go for a shallow bimble and dive as a 3 , me looking after son ( whilst looking after very knowledgeable buddy who never gets in to bother ...lol ) and buddy looking after me.
This is the reason why YD is brill, gets ya thinking about stuff you never thought of , but you definitely should have.

Cheers and safe diving all

Wooflad

Just had a brill thought, or maybe just i think its brill. I dont know how many other divers have children diving with them but maybe get a dads and lads weekend dive session organised, or even mums and daughters , just a family day whereby we sacrifice our diving for the sake of the littleones . Its much more fun for the kids if they can mix with peeps the same age.

If the font of knowledge that is YD has any thoughts on this then i would love to hear.

Cheers once again.

wooflad
 

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Nigel Hewitt
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But no, my wife hasn't done rescue - she thinks she's too small to do it!
You're just an insurance claim then.

My little niece is about 7 stone and she couldn't get a big fat dive out of the water but she can tow like a tug boat and AV with the best and that's on PADI training. She also watches a buddy carefully so if I'm going to have an incident I'd rather have it on her watch than a lot of big husky lads who might remember what to do, if I'm lucky, if they notice in time.
 

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When doing my Rescue course a few years ago it was quite amusing that all of the blokes were opting to lift me out of the water (a petite female of only 5ft 3 1/2). However, when it came to my turn, I had to lift a 6ft bloke out of the water using 2 different methods. Once I'd successfully achieved this, the level of testosterone raised and suddenly there seemed to be a competition as to who could lift the heaviest bloke.

So don't you knock us diddy people! The lifting methods are generally designed to help lift heavy weights.
 

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actually old chap I just wonderd

I had to look around but this seemed the most likely forum for this kind of topic. If there's somewhere better, please feel free to move it....I'm still feeling my way around here.

OK. Mostly, AFAIK, we're all taught to primarily dive in buddy pairs so that if one person gets in trouble the other can hopefully haul them out of it. Ok....I know there's a lot of solo divers out there too, but they dive their own self sufficient, equipment redundant, procedures if they have any sense.
Now last year I gave up smoking for medical reasons and subsequently have gained a whole lot of weight - maybe 60lbs (although I need to cut down the beer and drop some of that!) The thing is though that I often dive with my wife, who is a rather small Japanese lady now about half my weight. It has occurred to me recently that if something happened and she had to try and haul me out of the water we'd have a problem. It's making me rethink the whole advisability of simply diving alone with her - I hate to put her into a situation that she couldn't handle, and wasn't the cause of to start with.

What do you guys think about this? Any answers? Things to consider that might equal the balance somewhat? (yeah...OK....lose some weight!) Thinking about it I've often seen big guys dive with small wives and never really thought about it until now. Except for an air-share or so it's not exactly a fully capable buddy though, is it?

Thoughts?
I just wonderd old chap if you yourself had done any kind of rescue training as it struck me that if you had then you wouldn't of needed to ask this question. As if you havent then really you aint taking propper care of your verry precious wife.
Now go on be a gent and get it sorted for both your sakes.
And Happy diving wish you both luck.:teeth:
 

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same as all the others posters do a rescue course and if you did yours more than a few years ago do it again to keep her company she might even have to rescue you as part of the course. That will answer your questions :)

DAvid

ps. best course I ever did :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
I just wonderd old chap if you yourself had done any kind of rescue training as it struck me that if you had then you wouldn't of needed to ask this question. As if you havent then really you aint taking propper care of your verry precious wife.
Now go on be a gent and get it sorted for both your sakes.
And Happy diving wish you both luck.:teeth:
Yes, I did PADI rescue in 1999. I have to admit though that I did the course with BJDiving in Tioman, Malaysia. Two of us did it, myself and the owner"s (Ben) girlfriend. She wasn't as small as my wife but she wasn't that heavy either. I wasn't in a situation where I had to handle someone big - maybe that's a pity. The sea was flat calm with no current. I know she'd be fine doing tows and stuff - where we go locally though is a quite rocky entry. Sometimes the swell there is quite a handful to negotiate even on your own. It's more the idea of her trying to manhandle through something like that that gave me pause for thought.
I wouldn't have any problems with her though! :)


edit: Here's a pic....entry exit along the line - this is high tide, there are plenty of submergeged boulders to the right of the line.

 
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