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Seeing as Tek-talk is rapidly turning into DIR talk, thought this might be of interest to some, first the question:
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Hi all
I am a CMAS instructor in South Africa, and I have recently attended a CMAS
Advanced Nitrox course which was taught according to the DIR philosophy.

I understand the benefits and reasons for diving DIR in
deep/deco/overhead/cave/penetration dives and that ditchable weight is not
desirable.

There are, however people diving open water with single tanks and  backplates
with a one-piece webbing harness and no ditchable weight.

So my question is : What does the DIR philosophy teach about rescue and these
single tank open water divers with no ditchable weight ?
Regards
Monty

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and the reply
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Hello,

First I am not an authority on DIR.

You could ask this question on the Quest list or go to the http://www.gue.com/
web site and check it out

This is my understanding about the equipment configuration.

The purpose of a balanced rig is to be as close to neutral as possible through out the dive. The goal is to be neutral with empty tank or tanks in order to do your last shallow deco / safety stop but still be able in the event of flotation / bladder failure to swim your rig up from depth.

If it is a self rescue of any type then adding a little air orally should not be a big deal at the surface.

If you are performing the rescue on some one else then there is one less piece of equipment to remove. You could make them buoyant with their bladder.

As it has been discussed on other list: The fastest way to remove a back plate/ one-piece harness is to use your shears ( scissors ) to cut the harness away prior to starting the rescue breathing.  

In practice I had a dive master candidate remove my rig at depth and control the ascent. It worked well as the rig simply fell back off my shoulders after the crotch / waist strap were loosened.

If you are training students in rescue you can use a dummy belt for practice as that is what most of the victims they see will be wearing.
Hope this sheds a little light on your question.
If I misunderstood the intent of your question please let me know.
Bob Camus
NAUI # 14497L
 

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Seems to have ignored whether or not they were diving dry.. I'm happy without ditchable weight, but I'd want at least one backup source of buoyancy if I were diving wet, even if only an SMB..
 

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I recall being involved in the aftermath of a rescue attempt last year.Without going into to much detail,it sadly failed and the diver sadly died,some of the longer standing posters on YD may remember the thread.
Basically,at about 50m the diver was seen to be in trouble.He was at best unable to help himself,the diver going to assist him was unable to ditch the casualty's weight belt,so inflated his wing to lift him.The wing inflated,then promptly turned the casualty on his front.The 2nd diver was effectively holding the casualty up at this point and tried to make surface.All sorts went wrong and the bottom line was that the casualty sank and was recovered later.
Bottom line was,if the casualty's weight could have been droped quickly(with one hand?)and/or he had had sufficient lift then the chances are that he would have least made surface,assisted or otherwise.He did'nt so never had the option.I don't think that this is a DIR issue as such as a basic safety one:_
  However you config yourkit,DIR or not,it must all work together as a whole.It is your life support system,and even if it is proven to work on others,you need to be able to work it as an reflex action,like putting your hand to your face when you sneeze.As the above demonstrates,others also need to be able to work your system effectively,again part of the DIR philosophy.Again,if you can't get rid of your weight you mustbe sure you have the lift required,yourself,rather than rely on a potential rescuer.Not rocket sceience really is it folks?
Just a thought,take care all,Hobby.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
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As somone who is regularly teaching  CBL to trainees, i was more intrigued about the issues of one-piece harness on a casualty and how to get them out of it, sure you can use trauma shears, but it makes practicing rescues a bit impractical.
Additionally, I was wondering how folk with the one-piece no-buckles harness manage if they're diving from a RIB, do they find it easy to get out of the harness while holding on to the painter?
Chee-az
Steve
 

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Steve,

I have done loads of RIB dives in a one piece harness and it's a piece of cake to get out of. It's not worth worrying about.

Have you tried getting a casualty out of a one piece harness? It's very easy. I'd say that if you are familiar with the config it's more straight forward than looking for all thoses clips to undo. I have played the casualty for a number of trainee sport divers at my club and they never have any trouble. Also I played the casualty on a BSAC practical rescue managment course and the other guys quickly got me out of my rig and they were not familar with the config (they did moan 1st but were pleasantly surprised how easy it was).

If you are doing the rescue and need to de-kit in shallow water you can simply shrug the whole lot off - piece of cake.

Dive safe

Mark.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
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I've never tried dekitting someone in an unbroken harness and was just guessing by the apparent "snugness" of the fit when divers are getting into them, it would be interesting to try that at some point
Chee-az
Steve
 

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you can try it on me Stevey lad, to tell the truth it's something I've not tried myself yet and wondered what it would be like to get out of to climb back into a rib, so we can spend a daft 10 minutes dekitting both patient and self in the water
 

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Hello all,
In my opinion, DIR is more equivalent to dry suit diving than wetsuit diving. As my diving is mostly done a wet suit a reduntant wing is a must. I don't want to be at 50m or even less and had to swim up, and ditching weight is not an option as deco would be a nighmare. Also I know many here are DIR but don't tell me that getting a diver free in a rescue with one pice harness is same as one with buckles. As everything in life every thing has good and bad points, a one pice harness is defenetly stronger but is more dificult to remove. Especially if the diver being rescued have coomputer and other valves on hand that harness keeps sticking to. What are your opinions good or bad.
 

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It depends on how tight you have your harness. Mine is quite loose without the crotch harness and belt tightened. Anyone who dives with me know that you only have one belt clasp to undo and the whole rig is easily removed one arm at a time. Its quicker to remove my current rig that it was to remove my Seaquest Pro QD BCD with all its clasps and the velcro cumberband.

(Oh and by the way, I am most definitely NOT DIR - I just use what I think is of use to me)
 
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