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Here ya go Ron, more of the same by the looks. RIP to both boat's compliments and here's hoping they get official designation as War Graves. From today's Telegraph:

U-boats with entombed crews found off Yorkshire
By Paul Stokes
(Filed: 01/09/2003)


Two German U-boats sunk during the First World War have been found with their crews entombed on board off the coast of northern England.

Divers have spent the past decade looking for the early submarines, known as "iron coffins" or "sisters of sorrow", which were lost between 1917 and 1918. Eight are known to have been sunk off the Yorkshire coast and until last summer all but two had been traced.

Andrew Jackson and Carl Racey made the latest discoveries 200ft down on the seabed off Scarborough.

First they found UB41, last sighted by the SS Melbourne on Oct 5 1917, but have been unable to tell if she had struck a mine or suffered an internal explosion.

UB75, which left Borkum for the Whitby area on Nov 29 1917, was found a mile away upright and intact with little evidence of damage. She sank four ships before coming to grief herself.

The wrecks were at first thought to be off Flamborough Head, but they were found 30 miles away. The precise locations are not being publicly disclosed.

The German Government is taking steps to have the two sites declared as official war graves for the 58 mariners on board. The National U-boat Archive, near Cuxhaven, Germany, was amazed to hear of the discoveries. Expert divers are able to examine the vessels for only 15 minutes at a time.

A documentary on the search can be seen in Inside Out on BBC1 in the Yorkshire and Lincolnshire region tonight at 7.30pm.


Further reading on this:

http://www.uboatarchive.net/

http://www.gwpda.org/naval/sml00001.htm

http://www.bbc.tv/insideo....s.shtml
 
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