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Hi,

just trying to get an overall picture of what experiences people have had when transporting diving equipment on public transport.

what tips do you have when taking twinsets on trains?

how do you carry your kit, pre rigged or in a big F**k off bag?

I need some tipps as I am hoping to go to the Stoney gig but that involves taking my kit on the train.  I am also looking at traveling a lot more to dive this next season and would like to know how other people deal with this situation.  A car or similar is not an option at the moment.

thanks

DD
 

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wibble
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<font color='#000080'>I have already talked to DD via PM, but for anyone else who feels the need to brave the rail networks with kit here are my handy hints:

Get a trolley for the twinset.
Wrap the bottles in bin bags etc.
Get a bike lock and padlock the buggers to the nearest bit of immovable train.
If you can, get a bag with rucksack straps.
For gods sake book your tickets (seat reservation is usually included) - standing is no fun.

A friend of mine took her kayak to Nottingham by train by asking them to put it in the guards van at the end.  However, if the people you ask have a little bit of knowledge, they will know that diving bottles can (but i have never known one) go bang.  They may well ask for you to empty them first (which seems pretty reasonable to me).

I brought a 7l back from Birmingham no probs.
Busses may be a bit sniffy about the sheer volume of kit you have, plus you will be asked what the hell it is and see above for possible reactions to full cylinders etc.  Our local bus company once made an old lady walk from the main town to her home cos they wouldnt let her on with a bottle of parafin for her heater.
 

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what type of trolley do you advise?  somthing like a parcel trolley similar to what the lorry drivers use?
 

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wibble
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<font color='#000080'>No, a wee one that folds flat i got from Aldi for £15 ages ago.  The flat bit at the bottom hinges up so it is nice and compact.  The handle slides down too, making it even smaller.  Mind, if you are over about 5 foot 8 i wouldnt reccomend one as you would have to stoop a bit to wheel it along  
 

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would it old a 12L twinset and 2 pony bottles?
 

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that would be a yes then  
 

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<font color='#8D38C9'>Im no trainspotter but I would imagine (or hope) that the train companies would not be to keen on you transporting compressed air or mix tanks on trains. For the same reasons as some car insurance companies dislike it. Can you imagine the fire service being pleased after a train crash if you tell them that someone in the wreckage is a load of tanks, especially if you add fire to the equation.

might be wrong though
 

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"Three sheds"
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I got my blue trolly from B&Q. It cost £30, and can be used on 2 wheels or four and is great.

I have taken the twins on the bus before with it (but no additional kit). Just got on the bus and tried to look scary.

Laters,
   Janos
 

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I just got my 30 quid trolly from B&Q and it does the job really well for my twin set , just one tip get some Unibond metal glue and put it on all the bolt ends  before using it as I lost a nut only  after a couple of times ,as they just come undone with all the shaking and rolling .
 

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wibble
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[b said:
Quote[/b] (Ben @ Jan. 25 2004,15:46)]Im no trainspotter but I would imagine (or hope) that the train companies would not be to keen on you transporting compressed air or mix tanks on trains. For the same reasons as some car insurance companies dislike it. Can you imagine the fire service being pleased after a train crash if you tell them that someone in the wreckage is a load of tanks, especially if you add fire to the equation.

might be wrong though
<font color='#000080'>Thats why i say try to take them empty - my seven was empty when i took that.

Plus they weigh a bit less too!
 

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"hardly ever here"
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<font color='#000080'>i took my sevens home on the train in a backpack - no worries. the same backpack also fits all my kit without cylinders, so with two backpacks could carry everything.

would be a real pain though, which is why i generally get my boyfriend to drive me around  
 

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I made my trolley out of an old granny-style shopping trolley: took the tartan bag off and put a platform across the bottom. I got the granny trolley out of a skip at a local dump (I kid you not!)
 
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