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Will someone please write the trip report...!!!


I would write it except that I have come down with a cold (Thanks Paul) and being male think i'm going to die.
 

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Oddly, I too now have a cold and think I'm going to die...

I'm just writing up my log book, so may just cut and paste from that. Plus I have photo's of most people asleep :)

dan
 

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I'm seeing a pattern emerging here. I had a dry throat and rasping cough last night and put it down to all that O2 during deco.

Now, as it's getting a lot worse, I'm suspecting something else.

Here's a trip report:

9 of us went diving in Salcombe, organised by Mark Powell. We had a great time: pleasantly warm water, lovely weather, good company and ample beer.
 

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Will someone please write the trip report...!!!


I would write it except that I have come down with a cold (Thanks Paul) and being male think i'm going to die.
Oddly, I too now have a cold and think I'm going to die...

I'm just writing up my log book, so may just cut and paste from that. Plus I have photo's of most people asleep :)

dan
I'm seeing a pattern emerging here. I had a dry throat and rasping cough last night and put it down to all that O2 during deco.

Now, as it's getting a lot worse, I'm suspecting something else.

Here's a trip report:

9 of us went diving in Salcombe, organised by Mark Powell. We had a great time: pleasantly warm water, lovely weather, good company and ample beer.
Hmmm. Perhaps my cough is more sinister than I first thought. It does seem to be getting worse :(

Day 1: Medina

I had been really looking forward to this but was a bit let down. I guess I had built up a mental image and the wreck failed to live up to it. Still one to go back to for sure. Viz was a couple of meters, I think we swam towards the bow and returned to the shot. Deco was uneventful. On the whole though, as my deepest sea dive to date, I was pleased to have done it.

Day 2: Uxmoor (?)

Viz had improved dramatically. The wreck is quite broken up and lying in about 54m. The shot had come off the wreck but we found it easily enough. We followed the upturned hull towards the bow as far as the boilers and had a poke around. We then returned in the direction of the stern before bagging up and completing about 45minutes of deco. A much more enjoyable dive since the viz was better and the whole place was much lighter. A good thing as my Salvo died half way through the dive :(

Day 3: The Maine

Sea conditions had been borderline all week and Thursday was no exception. We considered our options for wrecks that were closer inshore and opted for the Maine. I had dived it with Nick on Mark's trip last year and have been trying to get back to it ever since! Since this is much shallower than planned we opted to 'kick the arse out of it' with an hour on the bottom. Viz was much improved on what we'd seen so far and over what we had yesterday. In fact it was like a totally different wreck. Very light and up to 10m in places. We dropped in near the stern and immediately got inside, moving towards the bow until the boilers. At this point we moved outside the wrecks and swam to the bow. Ascending up the point of the bow give an idea of the impressive size of this wreck. Both anchors are still inplace. We dropped back in to the wreck and through a small hole at the bottom of the bow section. It very quickly became clear that the area we wre in was tiny, only just enough room for me and Nick to get out again! We then swam length of the wreck inside, returning to the stern where we inspected the steering gear and prop shaft. the prop has been salvaged. We did another length of the wreck inside before bagging off from the highest point of the bow. Due to the depth we only had 15m @ 6 on o2.

Day 4: The Wreathier

A bit darker than on the Uxmoor but viz was still pretty good. The shot was drapped over the bow section which rises a good few metres. Everything astern of this is quite broken up. There are a couple of massive boilers and some other bits and bobs. Not much to see astern of the boilers. When we bagged up the current was running quite hard and Nick was having to pull the line to allow me to reel it in! I didn't notice and thought I was going too fast as a result of all the slack line :) 20 minutes @ 6m spend finning backwards, away from Nick. When I mentioned it to him on the boat he said he'd thought I was drifting away and was swimming to keep close to me :D

Overall a very enjoyable trip. It was a big shame the sea conditions were not better but the company was good and Salcombe is a lovely place to visit. Logistics aren't prefect and Mark had to order in o2 and he for us to blend ourselves as the shop only has a compressor! We stayed in the same B&B as last year and had forgotten about 'cardiac hill' as Howard christened it last year. Getting back from the pub in the evening was quite a chore. Also another opportunity to put names to faces. Paul, sorry you missed out. John, will definitely take you up on your kind offer. Dan, Sarah and Rob nice to see all again and, Carl, a pleasure to meet you too. Mark, well Mark was Mark :D and I look forward to being on a boat with him again.

Cheers/Nic
 

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Ok, so here's my bit ...

A trip organised by Mark Powell to Salcombe to dive some of the deeper wrecks out of Salcombe provided me with one really good dive :D but unfortunately a cold put and end to my diving for the rest of the week :frown:.

Day one – Well actually the night before … I arrived quite late as I only left Warminster at seven o’clock and the others were already down the pub. After slinging my bags in the B&B I set off with directions to the local hostelry. However a misunderstanding in the directions meant that a ten minute walk turned into an hour long detour :embarassed: – this is why I usually do not lead dives! Turing up I met up with Mark, John, Nick B and Tootricky.
The next day was sunny but with a bit of a breeze blowing, which meant a lumpy ride out. However the sea clamed down a little by the time we were out there and the shot was in, combined with Dive Time being such a nice stable boat, made it good to dive.
John & I went down the shot, with a brief stop at 6m for the customary bubble check, and then continued on until the wreck appeared out of the darkness. A quick check to make sure everything was ok and then over the side to bounce the sea bed at 64m, for no other reason than that we could. Ascending back up to the top deck at 54m we were confronted by a diver swimming along with a plate in hand! “Luck b*****d” flashed the thought across my mind. We continued on following the deck towards the bow with holes appearing invitingly below us until we reached the bow. Turning back we travelled a short way until John indicated time to leave, it seemed too soon but with the deco racking up we started up and deployed dSMB’s. Back on board I think that everyone agreed that this was a great dive, despite the vis being only 5m to 6m.
A very nice lunch was provided and after this we returned to port where cylinders were unloaded and taken to the dive shop for refilling. Which was going fine until the compressor gave out!

Day two – and I woke and knew immediately that there was going to be no diving for me this day. My nose was completely blocked I there was not the slightest chance of “popping” my ears. I, rather naively, thought that it might clear up and so set off intending to provide what assistance I could. The boat Loadsman, which operates out of Salcombe had a compressor on board and provided us with the air tops necessesary and once the gasses had been analysed and everyone was happy we set off. The original plan was to do the Layates but when we got out there it was just too rough and so we opted for the Uskmore. The shot went in, everyone kitted up and went in. I sat watching the sea, reading the paper and generally mooching around, snuffling and coughing, until the SMBs started hitting the surface. Keeping track of the ones up and a lookout for new ones to appear and finally all were up. Eventually everyone came up, were retrieved and dekitted. A rather nice spot of lunch, with cake in honour of Sarah’s birthday, and a pleasant trip back to port rounded off the day. Needless to say I had mixed feelings on hearing how good the dive was – glad for everyone that they had had a good time but disappointed that I was unable to be down there with them.

Day three – on waking I felt lousy. There was no way I was remotely fit to dive and so canned it completely. We loaded the freshly filled cylinders on and I took my stuff off and said my goodbyes.

Oh well there wrecks will still be there for next time.

Many thanks to Mark for organising the trip, to Paul and Francesca (sp?) of Dive Time and thanks to everyone else for making it a very enjoyable trip.

To those that may have caught my lurgy I do apologise - but at least you did get to dive all the wrecks ;) :D :D
 

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That's Dude with an E
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So, who got the pokey little box room with bunk beds, right at the top of cardiac hill, to share with Mark this year ?
 

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Beach-bum-Blonde Mafia ;o)
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Cracking reports guys - especially Nickb's summary :)

I'm confused though ;), where are the bits about stolen SMB's or birdsnests, OOA's, no mask swims, lost gas, shutdowns etc? Do you mean to say that diving with Mr Powell sir can be fun? :D
 

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Team Tricky: Diving with Twins
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the kind of human wreckage that you love
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Great trip report guys :thumbsup: well, from those feeling up to posting. Get well soon you poor t'others :)

Sounds like a fantastic week and I'm waiting on tenter hooks for Sarah's report, in particular the 'apres' dive evening gropes with Mark ;)

Maybe one day I'll be able to dive those depths but I'm already put off by "Cardiac Hill" :eek:mg: But then, could it be any harder that the trek, fully laden, to the Silica mines ? :rolleyes:
 

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We thought it might be the bulb, but we swapped it and still got the problem.

It could be a charging issue but I tried it on my battery and the problem was still there, hope it's not a ballast problem.
 

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Rob (YD username unknown to him) and I left Hemel just after 4pm on the Monday after a completely unproductive day at work. Traffic on the M4 was rubbish, but we finally made it to the campsite about 9. Sarah (S Jones) had arrived first and found us a spot on the site at Alstan Farm and Karl (Karl_D)had arrived not long before us in his camper.



We set up our tents and opened a couple of bottles of beer before getting our heads down.

For us it was going to be a particularly exciting week. Our first series of deeper dives since the trimix course last year and our first time in the sea with two deco cylinders each, all of our build up dives having been blown out this year.

After getting a bit lost in Salcombe, we eventually found the loading point, met up with Mark (Mark Powell), Nick (Nickb), Nic (TooTricky), John (John Touhig) and Paul (The Duck). We were on Dive Time, a large yellow cat which had come across from Weymouth for the week and was skippered by Paul and crewed by Francesca (sp?)

Day 1 - Medina

A P&O Liner, 12,350 ton. 550' long, 63' beam, 35' draught. Armed: 1x4.7". Master Henry Sandys Bradshaw. Left Plymouth on 28th April 1917 on her last leg of her voyage from Sydney to London, via India. Carrying passengers (put down at Plymouth) and general cargo. Torpedoed by UB-31 (Oberleutnant T Bieber) at 6:30pm, sank 7:28pm. Six souls lost.



Not sure, but think we were on the bow section. Viz wasn't as good as I was expecting, given what I had heard about the area. Lots of big snotty plankton in the water, making it relatively dark. Wreck seemed quite intact and upright, large bollards indicate the sheer size of her, but it's hard to be sure in the available viz. Dropped into a hold to get some coal.

A few wrasse about, nice to see male cuckoo wrasse again, didn't see any last year. Lots of anenomes and bib too.

Thumbed the dive on 20 minutes and Rob indicated to stop, it turns out that I have monofilament fishing line wrapped around one of the deco cylinder regs. Rob untangled this and off we went, making the first stop on time.

Gas switches at 30m to 40% and 9m to 80%. I launched SMB as we left the 21m stop, Rob didn't send one up today.

Everything went surprisingly well given the lack of practice with two deco cylinders in the lead up to the trip.

Felt fine after dive, no tiredness or niggles, so happy with the 18/35 tables we'd produced using v-planner.



We retired to the campsite to get cleaned up before heading back into Salcombe for a meal at the Fortiscue and then a couple of beers with the others at the Ferry Inn. Bad news! The compressor at the shop had broken. Mark contacted Pat Dean of the boat Lodesman who had a compressor on board and for the next couple of days we would have to get our air tops from him.

Day 2 - Uskmoor

W. Runciman & Co Steamer, 3,189 ton. 331' long. Unarmed. Master: O.G. Owens . On route from Dunkirk to Barry Roads in ballast. Torpedoed by UB-80 (KapitanLeutnant Viebeg) on at 6am on 5th March, 1918, sank 6:10am. All 32 crew saved - lifeboats picked up by HMS Lysander and taken to Dover.

[no photo]

It's Sarah's birthday today and she's bought her own cake! Plus Paul isn't feeling well so elects to say on board and be generally very helpful. To the dive!

The weather wasn't playing ball today, so our first choice of the Leyetee(sp?) was out, but the Uskmoor, further inshore was divable.

Sometimes you wonder what it was you did to deserve days like this...

At the 6m bubble check, Rob indicated that there was a problem so we ascended. It transpired that I had a leaking right hand post, so it was given a tweak and we dropped back down to 1m. It was still leaking, so up we went again and drifted off the shot so that the boat could pick us up.

Once on board, Paul refitted the first stage and we jumped back in. As a exited the lift gate, my fin fell off, so I threw myself in after it before it could sink (Jetfins). Once refitted I made my way over to the shot.

Down to 1m and everything looked good. 6m and still no bubbles so down we went. I moved to unclip my torch which wasn't there. I found it hanging below me on it's umbilical, having come unclipped at some point.

Managed to get to the bottom without further incident, but alas, there was no wreck in sight. We followed the drag line, between some quite large and now quite angry starfish and happened upon a broken hull.

The wreck was beautiful, with large numbers of pink sea fans everywhere. More cuckoo wrasse, the males are one of the prettiest fish I've ever seen.

My Ali 80 was feeling rather floaty. I initially put this down to not filling it last night so it only had 150 bar in it today. However, a quick check showed that the tail end was not clipped on. Really, it was like being on a course with Mark Powell...

Clipped the deco cylinder back in place and carried on. We thumbed the dive and made our way up to the 30m stop, where I found that I'd trapped the hose on the deco cylinder I'd restowed. Sorted that out and the rest of the ascent went without incident. Well, until the 21m stop, that is.

Both Rob and I launched our SMBs as we left the 21m stop. Within a metre of each other. So how did I manage to hit the boat with mine? By the time I'd realised what was happening, I'd lost contact with Rob and just as I was about to drop the spool and deploy the backup, there was a judder and the SMB came free. I made the rest of the ascent alone wihtout further incident.

I was pleased in a way, as I'd kept the stop depths and times despite the problems.

Back on board, I had a nice cup of tea and raved about my aim with an SMB and the sea fans. Gorgeous. Sarah's cake was nice too, it had smarties on it.



Back to the compressor shed where it was Karl and my turn to help Mark with the gas mixing. Things were a little more quaint than our gas mixing board back at the club, with just a hose and an analogue guage to blend with!

Once finished we met up with Rob and Sarah for a quick beer before going back to the campsite for a nice BBQ and some more cake.

Day 3 - Maine

Atlantic Transport Company cargo ship, 3615 ton. Armed: 1x4.7" (Gunners Jno Ramsey, William Mackintosh). Master William Johnston. On route from London to Philadelphia carrying general cargo. Torpedoed by UC-17 (Oberleutnant Ralph Wenninger) at 8:05am on 23rd March 1917, sank 12:45pm. All 43 crew saved.



Paul was not feeling well again, so decided to go home. However, he does seem to have left something of a legacy... Atchoo!

Again the weather was not playing ball. So we opted for the Maine, the shallowest wreck of the week and to my mind, the best.

Dropped in on the stern, the Rudder section just covered with Nudis. Proppellor missing (raised by the owners, Torbay BSAC).

Rob indicated via wetnotes that his suit had flooded and he was going up. I went in search of Sarah, Karl and John to join them. I found them in the hold, but didn't manage to communicate that I was joining them before they went inside. I decided not to follow as they didn't know I was there, then they wouldn't know to come and rescue me when I got stuck (which happens sometimes...)

So I headed up to the decks where it was light and very good viz. Passed the large engines, the boilers (a few, across the beam of the ship) and headed back down the side and round the bow where I started my ascent. The SMB was launched looking through the missing plates on the bow.

It's a beautiful wreck, with the light streaming through the beams and missing plates. It's gone on my list of favourites for sure and I'll be back one day, probably on a more suitable gas than 18/35!



Good news! The compressor at the shop is now working again and Sarah and Rob went back to blend the gas, so Karl and I adjourned to the pub for a couple of hours, soon to be joined by some of the others before we headed back to the campsite for another BBQ.

Day 4 - Wreathier

Allen Adams and Company cargo ship, 852 tons. 200' long, 31' beam. Armed: 1x18pndr (Gunners Frank Smallshaw, Davey House). Master: Alfred Percey Read. On route from Barry to Rouen, carrying cargo of coal (886 tons). Torpedoed by UB-35 (Oberleutnant Stoeter) at 4:15pm on 3rd December 1917. Three souls lost. Crew were noted in the Admiralty records for "very bad behaviour" - basically launching of lifeboats before the order was given by the master.

[no photo]

Back to the Leyetee (sp?) but a crab boat is dropping pots so it's a no-goer. Across to the Wreathier then, which was a splendid choice. John had joined Rob and myself today to make up a three. I don't dive in threes very often and find it a bit uncomfortable, but it went well until I cocked up my SMB deployment.

Another drop in on the bow. Current running a little, but not too bad. Checked Rob was okay and not experiencing a flooding suit.

Headed across the bow, resisted the urge to break the planned depth and so didn't get a piece of coal. Had a mosey around a strange sperical type vessel, about 2m in diameter with tube in the top. Then onto the boiler (one large boiler) and the engine (tripple expansion). Followed the wreck to the stern, where it met the seabed, turned and sheltered from the increasing current behind the engines. We thumbed the dive at 25 minutes and hit the 30m stop on time. John launched his SMB on the way up. Rob and I launched our SMBs at 21m while John was switching to his 50% deco cylinder. I mad a pigs ear of sendin up my SMB which resulted in it becoming something of a sea anchor, pulling me along much faster than Rob or John. This caused me much stress on the rest of the ascent. In hindsight, I should have let it go and deployed the backup.

Switch to 80% didn't go smoothely either. Hose caught on jubilee clip - need to take care stowing hose in future and move jubilee clip further round.

Some confusion (to me) about the stop times on the ascent, what with John being on different deco gases to us.



So after four days of top quality diving, we returned to Salcombe to unload, but not before a few of our number got in a sneaky five minutes...

Our Glorious Leader:


Two twinsets and TooTricky:


Sarah "I don't snore" Jones:


To sum up, four rather glorious days of diving. The wrecks were all very good in their own way, my favourite being the Maine followed by the Wreathier. I'm sure the Medina is also very good, but would require better viz.

Thanks to Mark for sorting out the trip and the logistics, and to Rob and John for being great buddies.

Sources:
Dive South Devon, McDonald
British Merchant Ships sunk by U-Boats in the 1914-1918 War, Tennent
World War One Channel Wrecks, Maw.
 

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the kind of human wreckage that you love
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What a thorough report :) Thanks :thumbsup: Really useful reading planning, skills, deco etc from others in such detail

I particularly liked this piece of detail :p

Sarah's cake was nice too, it had smarties on it.
And how good are you! Referenceing your sources :angel:
Sources: Dive South Devon, McDonald
British Merchant Ships sunk by U-Boats in the 1914-1918 War, Tennent
World War One Channel Wrecks, Maw.
I could do with you helping me sort our version control for this upcoming audit :rolleyes:

Sorry to hear about all the issues/problems/SMB target practice (there's a whole ocean out there and you find a boat !) but it sounds like you all had a fine time :teeth:

Can't green as I've already greened you today for some drivel ;)
 

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the kind of human wreckage that you love
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Is that green bag inbetween the black and red cars the "tent" you told me about ? :eek:mg:
That's not a tent ! That's not even a bivowak !!! That's a legionaires hat catching a breeze !

:rolleyes:
 

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Is that green bag inbetween the black and red car the "tent" you told me about ? :eek:mg:
That's not a tent ! That's not even a bivowak !!! That's a legionaires hat catching a breeze !

:rolleyes:
It's perfectly big enough for two people. Or two Umpalumpas, to be more precise.

dan
 

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the kind of human wreckage that you love
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It's perfectly big enough for two people. Or two Umpalumpas, to be more precise.
You can keep your "Umpalumpas" I'm proper sized, me! and I'm not sharing a tent with an Umpalumpa .................................................... unless Johnny joins us :p in which case I'll go on top :D
 
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