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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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I'm sure there's a lot of remedies for seasickness out there. I've yet to find a consitently reliable one. Ginger seems to help, but didn't help much at the weekend. Stugeron has never worked. Staring at the horizon isn't easy when kitting up. etc etc.

Any suggestions?
 

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Hi Dominic

As a fully paid up member of the fish feeders myself I utterly sympathise.  No over the counter meds work for me, and I am gradually working my way through the prescription stuff.  One thing that has been suggested is Scopoderm patches (containing hyoscine) which stick on behind your ear.  I haven't tried these yet, but you'd need to try them out of the water first as the side effects include dry mouth, blurred vision and difficulty passing water.
I have seriously considered bringing along something injectable but I hate intramuscular injections so thus far I have avoided this.
Good luck - let the board know if you find something that works for you

Fee
 

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I used crystallised ginger the other day and it seemed to help - in fact enjoyed it so much, I ate the whole pack!!
 

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Sit as near to the centre of motion of the boat as you can. It dramatically lessens the Uuuuuup and Doooooown. It works better then any of your fancy hippy, tree-hugging, happy-clappy substances as it deals with the reason your getting sick. The problem is if your already chundering then you need to be at the side of the boat anyway.

Peter
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
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The trouble is, there's not much of a center in a 4m rhib... and you have to kit up at the edge.

Ginger has helped in the past, but I've found it's hard to keep food in an easily-reachable space.

A bit of advice off the DIS list I intend to try next time - ginger drinks. Probably ginger tea, but I might take ginger beer instead (non-alcoholic) - a nice hot thermos of sea-sick preventing tea sounds good to me.

Tho it'll probably taste vile.
 

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i've always used boot's own sea-sickness tablets.  it says drowsiness is a side-effect but i've never noticed it.

giner sounds interesting.  when do you eat the ginger, before you leave land or when you start feeling sick?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
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As much as possible


When sucessfuly using ginger biccies, I've eaten them before setting out, as soon as we stopped, just before kitting up, right after returning to the boat.... etc etc.

But keeping them away from sea water whithout making them awkward to get to wasn't easy, so I'm hoping ginger tea will be a winner. Stick some chopped-up ginger in boiling water & then strain, it doesn't get much simpler than that..

Apparently some health food shops sell ginger tablets which I'll also take a look for - A few ginger tablets before leaving shore and a steady supply of hot ginger drink on the boat might just allow me to keep my breakfast down
 

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i was given chocolate coated stem ginger for christmas a few years ago, i suppose they have the advantage that they don't go soggy when wet.  plus, as long as you don't mind slightly salty chocolate, you could eat a few during deco ready for the boat!

i guess on hot days they'll become sticky tho which might be even worse than soggy.

you can buy ginger jam as well (i think tesco sell it as "ginger marmalade.")  some of that on toast for breckie, tablets on the quay, tea on the boat and choc covered stem on the shot line.  sorted.
 

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<font color='#000080'>aka sea sick steve lol

going down to litle h this year a day earlier so i can go out on the boat with the fishermen to throw up, so i dont loose a dive getting my sea legs lol

cant help you with the do`s but some donts include NEVER:-
drink fresh orange in the morning
eat a full english greasy breky
drink 15 pints of larger then have a kebab the night befour lol
use the boats  head


also
dont you just hate them that:-
eat all your butties
call you a land lubber
tell you its just a state of mind



went to the farns, out to the sumali, and the sea had those fookin huge rolling swels, i had some bad bug in my guts, and it just hated the sea,  i was soooooo ill, i was projectile vomiting and doing the same from my ar*e, not a pritty site, dont think i had ever been so ill
lol when the divers came up from the dive i was curled up in the fetal position crying for my mum, people walked over me and dumpet there kit on me, (had picked up a bit now) The cox (hardboat) asked the dive organiser what he wanted to do for the second dive, i told him streight that he was taking me back to land as i felt like shite and needed to get off, he explaned that that would ruin the chance of a good second dive and i was being selfish, i explaned that if he didnt that that would ruin the chance of any children for him, we went back lol
 

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The US Navy and the Swedish navy recommend Marzine as the most suitable antiemetic for divers. Like all anti-motion sickness drugs, it does cause drowsiness but has less tendency to do this than the alternative products. Scopolamine causes blurred vision and dry mouth, as well as central effects, when taken by mouth but Scopoderm patches are said to have much less tendency to do this, owing to the slow, even release of the active substance (the duration of action is 72 hours, making them ideal for liveaboard trips). The original plasters tended to fall off when wet but the new version is much better from this point of view. Scopoderm patches are unfortunately rather expensive but I would not hesitate to use them if I needed to (fortunately, I'm very rarely seasick). I agree that it would be best to test your reaction on dry land first, though. American divers seem to use Scopoderm routinely, by the way. Hope this helps.
 

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I went to the chemist's to ask for both the above and they told me Marzine was banned and Scopoderm was prescription only.  So it is a visit to the doctors for me........if you can go to the doctor's for sea-sickness.  Seems a bit of a waste of the NHS to me?
 

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Yes, Scopoderm is prescription only. I didn't know that Marzine was banned in the UK, though. I'm amazed! It's been on the market since the fifities and is still avauilable here and, as I understand it, a drug approved in one EU country is automatically approved in the whole of the EU. I'll check with the Swedish authorities and revert on this.
PS OF COURSE you can go to the doctor for seasickness!
 

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OK! I've now talked to the Swedish authorities and to the manufacturer of Marzine, GlaxoSmithKline. Marzine has NOT been banned in the UK but GlaxoSmithKline have decided to cease production all over the world owing to a falling global demand, a decision that has caused a lot of protests as it is considered to be the most effective anti-motion sickness drug and is also extensively used in oncology (for treatment of nausea and vomiting in cancer patients on cytostatic drugs). Unfortunately, the decision seems to be irrevocable. It's a good thing i bought 100 tablets before my recent Red Sea liveaboard trip, just in case. I'll give you some when I see you, Lou.
 

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Unfortunately the only 100% effective cure for Seasickness is to stand under a Tree.
Then for somepeople that can give them Landsickness.
 

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Isnt scopolamine a truth drug? I'd try it as long as the missus isnt on board aswell ;)

Stu
 

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[b said:
Quote[/b] (Dominic @ July 07 2003,07:55)]Any suggestions?
Yes, try to each as much as humanly possible before your boat trip, that way the entertaiment last longer for the rest of us.


For added laughs, try necking a bottle of ribena too , that way you can at least try to get some sympathy by pretending you've got internal haemorrhagging  
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
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I do actually eat before the dive for no other reason than to give my stomach something to bring up...

Now what WOULD be worth trying is swallowing the stuff in glowsticks before being noisily sick on a night dive


"Argh! Glowing vomit! He's not human!!"
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
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Tried two ginger-based things yesterday: Crystallised ginger (Don't like it much, but it's bearable) and ginger tea (Not too wonderful either, even with honey and lemon juice added).

I still threw up both before and after the dive, but it was more of a "Excuse me a moment *heave* Right, where were we?" situation, as opposed to "God, kill me now" - so I'm calling it a qualified success. It didn't cure me, but it at least stopped me from being incapacitated..

Now the search is on to find some sunscreen that can withstand diving...
 

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[b said:
Quote[/b] (Dominic @ July 14 2003,08:07)]
Tried two ginger-based things yesterday: Crystallised ginger (Don't like it much, but it's bearable) and ginger tea (Not too wonderful either, even with honey and lemon juice added).
i had a look around tesco and found kellogs "elevenses" bars come in ginger flavour; and jamaican ginger cake.  they might be more palateable for you, though i doubt they would have as much ginger content.

personally i quite like it crystallised, and the look on some people's faces was quite amusing when they ate it without realising just how strong the taste is.  


[b said:
Quote[/b] ] Now the search is on to find some sunscreen that can withstand diving...
i slapped some on some factor 35 then happily suited up and was half-way to the rosehill before it dawned on me that the latex might not like it so much.  

does anyone know if 1) sunscreen harms the seals and, if so, 2) is there any that doesn't?

a lot of the kids ones are supposed to be waterproof .  i wonder whether they actually are or if this is just an advertising "embellishment."
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
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Ah, I've found a possible solution I forgot to mention for palatable ginger:

Home-made orange and ginger turkish delight

I made it on Saturday, but it needs 24 hours to set, so I didn't get to take it with me on Sunday.. but it was something to look forward to when I got home


I'll let you know how I get on with it next dive trip


It never occured to me that sunscreen might attack latex seals. Bummer, it's not just a matter of finding something water-resistant after all.

Maybe I'll just get one of those peaked caps with the bit of cloth that hangs down over the back of your neck after all...
 
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