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This afternon, I'll finally be collecting a half dozen glass disks two inches across! Yay!!

And before I get locked up for posting about a non-diving issue: They're the disks that I'll be putting in my home-built dive torch to replace the crappy plastic ones.

At last, I'll have a lens that doesn't melt and start to bubble when it gets too warm! 50 watt bulbs, I hear you calling!!! Ahahahaha!!!

(I could use a 100 watt too, but only for about half an hour before the batteries give up their will to live...)
 

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So how much has it cost in all, how easy was it, can we see some piccies, and could a complete electric dunderhead (me) build one?!
 

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[b said:
Quote[/b] ]So how much has it cost in all, how easy was it, can we see some piccies, and could a complete electric dunderhead (me) build one?!
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About £100 for the bits that made the torch, and about £30 for the book that told me how to build it.

It was very easy, actually - I've tarted it up a bit since I first got it built, but I put the basic unit together in a single weekend.

The pre-tarting up piccies can be found at http://www.oneandoneis2.demon.co.uk/DiveWeb/torch.htm - I've adding some disconnects to the battery cables since then (The battery was originally permanently connected to the torch)

Elctronic dunderheads can, of course, build them easily. How else do you think I managed to build one?
I don't know a transistor from a capacitor, but torches, when you get right down to it, are dead simple: All they consist of is a battery, a light bulb, and some wires to connect the two together.
HIDs are more challenging, of course, but I'm not interested in them just now.
Basically, my construction work consisted of:
Trip to Maplins to buy batteries and switches.
Trip to Wickes and B&Q to buy a bit of drainpipe, some end units for the drainpipe, a 2D Maglite, some cable, some compression fittings, and a crappy cheap spotlight unit that I could take apart to get a bulb socket.

Took it all home, drilled a hole in the end of the maglite for the cable to go through, used the compression fitting + an O-ring to make a waterproof cable gland. Hammered out the inner workings of the Maglite (IE the switch unit) and soldered the light socket to the cable.

Chopped the drainpipe to size, glued an end cap to it with Araldite, sealed it with silicon sealant and Duck tape.

Drilled two holes in the other end cap for the cable and a switch to go through.

Soldered bits of wire to the batteries, switch, and cable connected to the bulb unit.

Plugged in a bulb, threw the switch, and Lo! There was Light!

Dead simple, when you know how..

I'm planning on putting a more exhaustive "How I did it" guide to it on my web page, but I haven't had time yet..

(Edited by Dominic at 9:17 am on July 10, 2002)
 
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