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I have a couple of non diving friends Going out to Sharm in a couple of weeks and they have asked for advice of what trips are worth doing, I always spend pretty much every day on a boat so hoping the someone can help, they are also looking for decent Restaurants or ideas for nights out.

any help would be great.

Tony
 

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Making God laugh...
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Well, I live here and have never done a trip, but here goes...

Mount Sinai, if you are religious or fancy watching the sun rise over the Sinai.
Coloured Canyon - but its a bit of a trek.
Desert Trips (walking in Nabq National Park), but not quad biking as you'll see sod all but dust.

let us know what hotel your in and I'll recomend local restaurants.
 

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Living a champagne lifestyle on a lemonade budget!
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I have climbed Mount Sinai and it was a wonderful experience. Photos here:
Georgina Cole's Photos - Climbing Mount Sinai 2007 | Facebook

And here is the Mount Sinai part of an article I wrote for El Gouna magazine:
The following day we left Alexandria for a mamouth ten hour trip in the minibus, taking the ferry at Suez, then driving down the Sinai coast to our hotel near St Catherine's Monastery. Meeting for dinner soon after arrival, we were told that our wake up call the next morning would be at 1.30am and we should buy a torch as we would be trekking up to the top of Mount Sinai in the dark!!

Rachel and I were the only two who managed to get up at this hour and we made our way to reception for some hot tea. Abdul was waiting for us and drove us to the gates of the Monastery. Here we chose a guide who would escort us up the mountain in time for the sunrise. The highest peak of the mountain is 2,285 meters above sea level overlooking the valley where Moses is said to have heard the Lord speaking from a burning bush. There are two routes to the top, the first is along the camel path where Bedouins are waiting to offer their camels if the climb becomes too hard or the second route is by 3,750 steep and rocky steps. We chose the camel path and set off at a brisk rate with our guide, Ibrahim, who proudly had Rachel and I on each arm. It was now 2am.

The route was very crowded and very dark. There were hundreds of people starting the trek and hundreds of camels too. It was hard to see much apart from all the torch beams snaking along the trail above and below. Keeping our eyes on the path, occasionally we would hit a traffic jam and find our face in the backside of a camel with another treading on our ankles behind! After a while the crowds eased as everyone picked their own pace.

After about an hour and a half of brisk climbing, Rachel began to wilt. Suffering from asthma, she had to take rests on the rocks with her inhaler. Bravely she tried to continue but decided a camel was her only option. Ibrahim disappeared to look for his friend who had a good camel while I continued the climb alone, arranging to meet up at Shop No. 3 near the summit.

All along the dark route are little huts to stop for a quick rest and buy refreshments as you climb higher and higher. Also all along the route you hear the shouts from the tour guides trying to locate their group in the darkness as they spread further and further apart.

It was now 4.30am and eventually I reached Shop No. 3 and settled down on a bench of Bedouin rugs with a welcome mug of hot chocolate to wait for Rachel and Ibrahim. As the clocks hadn't yet changed to summertime, the sun was due to rise at 5.15am. The following week we could have had an extra hour in bed! Rachel and Ibrahim soon arrived and just before 5am we began the final steep climb to claim a good position on the mountain peak. The wind at the top was very cool so we wrapped ourselves up in a hired blanket and huddled together for warmth on the rocks with Ibrahim enjoying his position in the middle of us.

The summit was now packed with people, with hundreds more still climbing, as the sun started to shed a red glow over the mountain peaks. The sunrise is spectacular. Just breathtaking. All around we could hear groups quietly reciting the Lord's Prayer as well as the sound and flashes from all the cameras capturing the moment. A few men laid out wooden trays filled with onyx souvenirs, balancing them between the rocks and visitors, never missing an opportunity of a sale even at the top of a mountain at sunrise! With the sun now warming us we spent a while taking in the view and visiting the small chapel on the summit.

It was a shame to leave the top of the mountain but the thought of the climb down with already aching legs was quite daunting. For the descent, I chose the 3,750 Steps of Repentance route while Rachel re-mounted her camel and set off with Ibrahim. The step route was very steep, some steps are one meter high, and very rocky. The pressure on your knees and ankles is immense as they took it in turns to absorb your weight. As it was now light, the view is incredible but hard to enjoy while concentrating on the steps and with the pressure of hundreds of people behind you! There are no camels on this step route to come to your rescue so you have to keep going. Two weeks of intense training in a gym would have been a good idea. Eventually, St Catherine's Monastery comes into view below while all around the video guides spring up and down the mountain like goats filming their group.

Rachel and I were reunited at the start of the path at 7.30am. Five and a half hours of climbing but so worth all the pain! Limping back to our minibus, we decided to disappear back to bed for a couple of hours as Karen and Carol surfaced for breakfast and did a very interesting tour of St Catherine's Monastery.
 

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If they're up at Naama we had one of the nicest meals we've ever had there. Little 'restaurant' virtually opposite red sea dive college. Sitting at a table on the edge of the beach eating BBQ lobster and prawns..... Really nice meal and dirt cheap as well.
 

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Ultimate Planner
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Thanks for the post Georgina,

I have suspicion that that kind of thing is a bit strenuous for the girls although I will offer the suggestion.
Trekking Mount Sinai is not that difficult. Trekking Mount Katherina is.
 

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Making God laugh...
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The girls are staying at the Sharm Holidy resort if anyone has any idea of decent Resturants etc anywhere near.
Mmmm, "Little Russia".....

They are 400m walk up the hill from Naama Bay town centre if they use the rear entrance to the hotel, walking down the hill they will come to KFC & Pizza Hut as they round the corner into the area. The good news (if they are young enough) is that it is only a short walk from there to Little Bhudda and Pacha, if that is their thing.

Regards
 

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also looking for decent Restaurants
I enjoyed the traditional dishes at Abu El Sid, the Egyptian place above the Hard Rock Cafe in Naama. For an meal to western standards here's always the Tandoori and Italian restaurants at the Camel hotel (the Italian does a great cheap lunch buffet as well).
For seafood: Sinai Star in Old Market.

For a special experience have dinner on the jetty at the Lido. Get a table at the railing next to one of the floodlights and watch dozens of lionfish hunting in the shallows.

Also check out Sharm restaurants - ScubaBoard and http://www.yorkshire-divers.com/forums/worldwide-dive-sites-accommodation-liveaboards/72378-sharm-restaurants-2.html
 
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