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Well, just spent the weekend setting up my new twinset and then testing it for the first time at Stoney Cove yesterday. I thought it'd be like being a newbie again and would take quite a few dives to master it but NO! First dive, immediately realised I'd strapped the cylinders on too high as I spent most of the dive face downwards, banging the back of my head on the pillars everytime I looked up. No problem! Two minutes in the carpark - unfastened the Scubapro tank cam bands I have chosen, readjusted the height of the tanks, retighten and voila! Second dive was easily the best dive I have EVER had as far as equipment and technique was concerned. With the harness well fitted and adjusted, the twin 12s are surprisingly easy to walk with on the surface, but underwater, the whole system just vanishes! Can't fault it. Haven't yet mastered the whole isolator bit - I know I'll be tinkering with this system for many months to come - but first impressions are very positive!

Thanks to all who contributed ideas and comments over the past few months.

Regards
 

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Resistance is futile, you will be assimilated
 

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invert 'em.
invert 'em.
invert 'em.
invert 'em.
invert 'em.
invert 'em.
invert 'em.
invert 'em.
invert 'em.
 

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Invert 'em!!

If you can't reach the isolator just now then there's no point having a twinset. Unlikely I know, but the next dive could be the one where you have a blow out.
 

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If you can't reach the isolator:
a) Remember to keep your elbows tucked in as much as possible
b)Try releasing the waist strap - then you can pull the whole rig up a bit.

I can reach all three valves on my twins... but it's a lot quicker & easier to shut them down if I pop the buckle.
 

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It would probably be even quicker if you......inverted them!Imagine a "very" small space(some people actually have to go into the space between a subs.pressure hulls for eg.)where your arm movt.is restricted somewhat and you'd appreciate the benefits-as do those who've used this config in such conditions.Arguments aside, it's done that way ,by people who dive in possibly the worst conditions- all factors considered- as a result of development and experience.It's got an unrivalled safety record as such.If that's not enough consider why they stopped using the shoulder mounted valve config a long time ago,it was'nt just for a laugh! Stoke that fire boy,stoke ,stoke,ho,ho,ho.Stay safe all!
 

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Probably. But it's far too much effort

Keep meaning to give it a try in the pool... have to get round to it soon


(Edited by Dominic at 2:24 pm on May 1, 2002)
 

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Tis indeed a ball ache,I've not inverted my other set yet,procrastination is the theif of time.Think about this too,one of the benefits of inverts is that you very rarely clout your valves/manifold assembly.The most common place we tend to strike is around our head(God or whoever knew this before us and gave us a skull-and helmets!).Anyway,the WKPP say that the most common failiure point is bt free flow due to losing a valve knob or by roll-off followed by loss of knob(due to contact-refer to website).Does it not stand to reason that this is reduced by inverting?

(Edited by Hobby at 2:21 pm on May 1, 2002)
 
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