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To dive or not to dive - that's not even an option
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Hi There

I'm presuming this is an epirb or similar?

It is my understanding that the frequency they work on currently is due to cease as the satalite it uses is being decomissioned. Watch you don't buy somthing which will be obsolete in the next 12 to 18 months. I don't think anything is yet commercialy available as a replacement, not a waterproof one that is!

Your local Coastguard may be able to confirm this, mine did.

James
 

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273 Posts
Hi There

I'm presuming this is an epirb or similar?

It is my understanding that the frequency they work on currently is due to cease as the satalite it uses is being decomissioned. Watch you don't buy somthing which will be obsolete in the next 12 to 18 months. I don't think anything is yet commercialy available as a replacement, not a waterproof one that is!

Your local Coastguard may be able to confirm this, mine did.

James
Neverlost is not an EPIRB.

Going slightly off-thread now but seeing as the issue of EPIRBS has been raised;

There are two frequencies - 406MHz and 121.5MHz.

Satellite monitoring of 121.5 is being switched off in February 2009. 406MHz technology is much more powerful, faster, more accurate and identifiable to an owner. You can also get 406 units with built in GPS. Authorities can potentially act on distress from a 406 as they can be picked up by satellite within seconds to minutes. They are good for deep ocean as well.

121.5 units are common place and much smaller. There are problems with false activations and they are typically much less powerful and triangualation often provides a position only as accurate as within 2 or 3 miles of actual position. The other problem with 121.5 is that if it is a satellite only that picks up the distress then it requires two passes of the satellite before anything can be done. Depending on whether the satellite had just passed range when the epirb was activated then it can take up to about 7 hours before authorities act on a satellite activation only. In busy areas (most areas of the UK) commercial aircraft are never far away and they do report in 121.5 activations.

Where the 121.5 units are good is that they are small and compact. Furthermore they are cheap. In most lost diver scenarios people will know about the missing diver and one would hope that the diver would have told the dive organiser/skipper that he/she has a 121.5. Even after Feb 2009, SAR aircraft and boats will still have 121.5 detection capability and use a direction finding and strength unit to fly straight to the epirb being able to pick it up from miles away. So even after Feb 2009 these units will be a valid surface detection aid although one should consider purchasing one of the new smaller 406 units coming on the market.

Andy
 

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400 L
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277 Posts
Desert Star systems

Are you looking specifically for a Neverlost system or something that fulfills this function?

If it doesn't have to be a Neverlost then have a look at the Desert Star web site. Their units are much cheaper and work very well. I have a Scout transmitter and receiver, together with a sport receiver which is adequate for a buddy. I have had these for about ten years and they have served me well in strange locations where I want to find the shot and don't want to trail a line from it...... Avoids the embarassment of surfacing in the "wrong" spot.:embarassed:

Sport & Scout

Best wishes,

Neil
 
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