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Another post set me thinking.  How do we judge a "good" diver?  What do YOU look for in a good diver (not a bad one, that would be too easy.)


Is it someone who's just done lots of dives?  Who's been doing it a long time?  

Is it someone who's kit is immaculate, with everything there for a reason and everything in its place?

Is it someone calm and unflappable, regardless of circumstances?

Is it someone who's in-water skills are faultless?

Your thoughts?

(I'd do a Poll, but haven't worked out how, yet)
 

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[b said:
Quote[/b] (Mdemon @ June 11 2003,11:59)]Another post set me thinking.  How do we judge a "good" diver?  What do YOU look for in a good diver (not a bad one, that would be too easy.)


Is it someone who's just done lots of dives?  Who's been doing it a long time?  

Is it someone who's kit is immaculate, with everything there for a reason and everything in its place?

Is it someone calm and unflappable, regardless of circumstances?

Is it someone who's in-water skills are faultless?

Your thoughts?

(I'd do a Poll, but haven't worked out how, yet)
Mdemon,

Possible downsides;

Doing it a long time - Could have been using poor skills all that time. Can they accept new ideas.

Immaclate kit - It's new and they don't know how to use it correctly yet! Can they tell you the reasons for the placing, or just copying someone.?

Calm and unflappable - Maybe not assessed circumstances correctly.

Faultless skills - could be they won't want to dive with you!

Mine

The above with caveats.

Are they ready, not kitting up in a rush.

Assess and pre-empt what is happening all the time. They see the accident about to happen.

Have they organised dives - shows they should be thinking about the dive, not just breathing underwater.

How do they do other complex things, ie Driving. Would you be a passenger with them? Do they break hard, because they did not see the guy step off the road? A good measure of their approach to safetly and people around them.

Others that I am unconscious of probably.

Adrian
 

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<font color='#0000FF'>Calm, attentive, patient and safety conscious. My best buddy is my wife as we think alike and understand each other underwater. However when she's not diving I've had all sorts. I like a good diver to have the above qualities, look at sorroundings, not scared to speak out if in doubt and also helpfull on loading and unloading. OK a lot of this is topdeck, in the water I'd expect a godd diver to be sufficiently near you in case of OOA situation but not close enough to feel obstructed.Much easier to spot a poor diver than a good diver.
 

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Some one who has the skills necessary for a particular dive but also, and more importantly, some one who really thinks around diving, understands it and who questions the standard words of wisdom.
 

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Regular and experienced. In my experience all other qualities attributable to a good diver are present in these circumstances.

Oh yeah - not afraid to admit if something went/was done  wrong. This attribute is found in some but not all regular and experienced divers.

The ultimate sign of a good diver in IMHO is a willingness to buy the first round.
 

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[b said:
Quote[/b] (Adrian Kelland @ June 11 2003,15:06)]And drive you home ?  
Only if they have been on the geezer gas - else they might fall asleep at the wheel.
 

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<font color='#000F22'>Definition of a good diver:

Any one whos kit is thaught out

Any one who plans their dives

Any one who can send up a blob without getting into a tiz and then ascend slowley to hold a 6m stop.

Any one who dosent fin like mad for no reasion

Any one who can avoid kicking up the viz most of the time

Any one who is calm on the boat and in the water

Any one who uses buddy glue

Thats about it.

When someone on the boat has forgoten his deco reg, lost his only O ring, then askes if Nitrox 36 is ok for the planned 50m dive should be avoided


ATB

Mark Chase
 

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Hi Guys

To me its someone who is in control - They have the awairness Adrian has covered, there kit is sorted, they are corectlly buoyant, they understand and follow the plan, respond to signals without hesitation, are close but not on top of you (hang on these have all been covered), its all part of being in control.

I see it more in many inexperienced divers than i do in quite a few experienced ones, i feel you dont need lots of experience to have this just some quality basic training and and the right levels of alertness and self control / confidence.

Just wish i had some of these qualities myself.

Safe Diving

Paul
 

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<font color='#0000FF'>Paul and me would say " Anyone that dives out of Dover ".

Mark Chase and me " Our mate VICW "


I would say " Any commercial diver diving on his own whilst diving with his local club "
 

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A good diver doesn't rush or rush their buddy they take the time to do a proper buddy check and pre-plan a dive. Good divers can look out for themselves and will also look out for their buddy. A good diver, is primarliy aware of their buddy, they systematically check where the buddy is regularly and seek to maintain a position relevant to the buddy where they can also be easily observed.  They check their own air consumption regularly and exchange air pressure contents signals at pre-arranged intervals. They set a pace thats suitable for their buddy to keep up. I suppose the most important quality is patience with those club divers who aren't at their standard.  Remember its unlikely that any amatuer is fully water fit or has sufficient experience or practice's regularly enough to develop their full potential ability.
 

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<font color='#000080'>I perhaps don't have enough experience as a diver to give a fully qualified opinion on this but I can perhaps draw an analogy from my other exprience.

I'll risk losing a few potential buddies by disclosing that I am a police officer. Part of some of the work I do involves some pretty scary driving and, as you would hope, I have had some very high level training at it.

Now all bobbies have to take a training course which is higher than the standard driving test before they get behind the wheel of a panda. Unfortunately some, once they pass the test and get certified to drive, don't maintain that standard.

The problem is that they have gone on the course believing that they already know how to drive. They make the right noises to pass the course and then go back to doing it the way they always have.

Their problem is that they are overconfident in their own ability, they refuse to accept to wisdom that is passed down to them and insit on doing it as they think. They also fail to fully appreciate the magnitude of the dangers inherrant in the activity.

(Before you all get too worried, officers like this are few!)

I imagine this might ring a bell about some of the divers you know.

Now the question was about "good" divers.

For me it is someone who understands their own limitations and does not attempt to exceed their ability. They believe in and accept their training as wisdom passed down by those who may have learned the hard way and know better. As a result they stick to the best practice that they've been taught. Finally, they understand the risks involved in the sport and are not reckless with their own or anybody else's lives.

It's attitude that counts.
 

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[b said:
Quote[/b] (Mark Davies @ June 18 2003,15:09)]
<font color='#0000FF'>
[b said:
Quote[/b] ]It's attitude that counts.
I'd go along with that

[b said:
Quote[/b] ]I'll risk losing a few potential buddies by disclosing that I am a police officer.
I think as long as you're not a Traffic Cop you'll be ok  

One of my best mates is in the TSG and you should hear what they say about the Traffic bunch  
 


Chee-az
Steve
 

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[b said:
Quote[/b] (Mark Davies @ June 18 2003,15:09)]I'll risk losing a few potential buddies by disclosing that I am a police officer.
<font color='#000080'>Crikey if I let that put me off,  that would reduce my list of potential buddies by at least half a dozen...  


Daz
 
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