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You've more chace of winning the lottery than being attacked by a shark Kate. I blame Steven f***ing Speilberg, what a t*** he is, IMO he's personally reponsible for a lot of the bad attitude towards sharks.

Anyhoo that photo looks very like a Great White, which you won't get in the Red Sea 'cos it's too warm. Even if they were there, to see or encounter one would be as rare as hens teeth. Even the supposedly most dangerous sharks can be perfectly safe, eg Bull (aka Zambezi) sharks, BUT... only really dangerous because they can tolerate both salt and fresh water (euryhaline) so tend to migrate up river where viz is bad and they can't discern that a swimming human isn't a large fish.

If I were you I'd worry less about sharks in the red sea and more about the Italian divers!  Personally if we see sharks when we go i'll be ecstatic, sure sharks give you a bit of an adrenaline rush but at least you'll know you're alive
Carpe diem!


You're more likely to find GW's in the med, especially around the Sardinia area, IIRC it's now believed that the Med may be an important breeding area

when you say white tip do you mean WT reef or Oceanic white tip? the OWT's can be extremely fearless (unlike most shark species). In fact my old PhD supervisor , who spent years diving around the Caribbean day in day out, said he was never put in danger by a shark encounter, but you know those cute and cuddly bottlenose dolphins? Twice he nearly died when he got harrassed by those - don't believe all that you see and hear! TBH, i think diving, if you use it as an excuse to read up on the marine biology side of things, is a great way to remove your shark phobia, which I promise you is as groundless as most phobias are. Check out the Dive mag Shark Special issue (£4.99) for an easy intro to sharks and their biology, (if it's still available)

Chee-az
steve

PS surfers are more prone to shark attacks than divers, plus I think there are only about 20 shark attacks (including non-fatal ones) worldwide per annum, now, compare that to the fact that about 17 people die as a result of road traffic accidents every day of the year in this country, driving to the airport is going to be more dangerous than your diving is
 

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Kate, Italian divers have, by all accounts, no bouyancy control and even less manners, the first you'll know about them is after they've crashed into you and finned off without apologizing, two friends of mine did their PhDs in the Red Sea (it's a hard life for some innit?), diving every day week in week out, their stories about hassles with the Italians are legion, often the italians would mess up weeks of careful experiments because they couldn't manage to stay off the bottom or tried to pinch their scientific equipment


Actually, I used to be as afraid of sharks as you are, I was about 13 when Jaws was first released and after seeing that at the cinema, God was I scared of the sea !!! Then I was on holiday on the south coast later that year, and the (older) guys and girls I was hangiing around with decided one evening that it would be a laugh to swim out to the buoy just off-shore, you know, exactly like the opening scene of Jaws, I was ****ing my self!!

even the feel of the kelp around my fins used to freak me out. But... that fear was like most fears, based on ignorance, it's like the man said "There is nothing to fear but fear itself..."
HTH
Steve

PS I also used to be phobic about insects and stuff too until I actually learned how amazing they are, now I love 'em for their amazing diversity.

Actually, did you know that of all the animal species documented on the planet, one-third of them are beetles? Some Religious type person once asked the renowned evolutionary scientist, J.B.S. Haldane "What has the study of biology taught you about the Creator, Dr. Haldane?",
to which he replied "I'm not sure, but He seems to be inordinately fond of beetles."

Decompression  theory addicts might be interested to know that JBS Haldane was the son of John Scott Haldane who developed the first ideas on decompression theory.
 

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Personally, I'd rather a shark was in front of me rather than behind me as I finned away, more chance of smacking him on the nose to get him to go away. THe only sharks I've seen in the wild close up have been Nurse Sharks, big enough to hurt you if they wanted too but they've little or no interest in us and TBH, sharks have far more to fear from Man than we have from them.
 

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THe big issue is that sharks (cartilagenous fish, elasmobranchs ) have a far more limited breeding strategy than other fish (bony fish or Teleosts). eg   Salmon spawn eggs and sperm in a "broadcast" manner literally millinos of gametes (eggs or sperm) in one go, elasmobranchs tend to fertilise internally and sometimes develop the zygote (fertilised egg) internally or lay the characteristic "mermaid's purse" egg cases wherein the young deveop before "hatching" (or more strictly speaking "eclosing")
Consequently elasmobranchs can't respond rapidly to depleted numbers, add to this that elasmobranchs generally have a loger period before entering sexual maturity than teleosts and you can see how easily the situation goes from bad to critical.
Most of this is due to the oriental love of Shark fin soup, personally I won't go into a Chinese restaurant which lists SFS on its menu, in fact Chinese restaurants are very poor at providing for veggie dishes generally speaking
 
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