YD Scuba Diving Forums banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Imported post

Recommendations please on my first cylinder size 7 10 12 15 litre , Pros and Cons  

(Male/6foot/13 stone)



Dumpy or not dumpy that is the question!
 

·
wibble
Joined
·
11,450 Posts
Imported post

12l dumpy.  7 is weeny, 10 is still small unless you are light on air, or you plan to do lots of shore diving.  15's weigh a ton.  I have twin 10's, a 12l tall (my first cylinder, dumpys wernt around then), a 3l and 7l stage cylinders.
 

·
currently offshore, please leave a message
Joined
·
1,106 Posts
Imported post

I would not realy use a dumpy as it can be awquard to rest the weight on the edge of a RIB or on a ledge I would say a 12L full length.

hope this helps

DD
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,786 Posts
Imported post

If you're a strapping six footer then a 15ltr will be easy to lug around and you'll probably appreciate the extra air
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
676 Posts
Imported post

<font color='#810541'>6ft, then don't even think about a dumpy, they are horrible and you havent got as much adjustment as with a tall cylinder.

12 or 15 depending on air consumption.
 

·
The Artist formerly known as 'John Duncan'
Joined
·
364 Posts
Imported post

<font color='#F52887'>12 or 15 tall, as has been said the dumpys are OK but talls are easier to rest on the side while kitting up.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,793 Posts
Imported post

If you get a 15, you can buy a pony later, get redundancy but are limited to "standard" rec diving.  If you are a newbie, you'll appreciate the extra gas in a 15.

If you get a 12, you can also buy a pony later and get redundany.    BUT, if you get hooked, you can get another 12 later and strap it with the first to form a twinset.  Now you can start looking at more challenging, "technical" stuff.  And having even more gas if great!  However, doing simple dives with twin 12s can be overkill - and they do weigh LOTS (~36Kg full).

You could do the same with a 10 - same as for the 12s, but you start with a smaller tin.  As a newbie, you might get fed up being first back to the boat all the time with the limited gas.  However, if you twin with another 10 you end up with a much more manageable twinset.

You could go straight to twin 7s.  A great setup, redundancy, easy to lug about.  But, less gas, and your initial outlay is going to be much higher, including extra training unless you've got an experienced mate.  More gas would be useful as a newbie - you can get higher pressure 300bar 7's which would help though.  And if you want to go technical, you've already got the experience of twins - and two stage cylinders if you go to a bigger twinset later.

It's a tough choice - made easier usually by the price. With little cash and no inclination to get techy, a 15 would be a good start. Very brief I'm afraid...
 

·
The Voice of his (De)generation
Joined
·
1,418 Posts
Imported post

I would go with the 15ltr - that was the first tank I bought and it was very useful - I'm only about 5'8'' (am quite stocky though) and never had problems - wouldn't buy a dumpy I hate them - awful things altogether.  When I started I used a 15ltr and then moved up to a 15ltr and a 7ltr pony and that configuration worked a treat - quite balanced and a fair bit of air to boot.  If and when you move to deeper stuff the 15 will likely become obsolete but is still useful for the odd dive here and there and you can always sell it on also as it si quite a common size.
Dinger
 

·
A short fat well off crap cave diver. Likes wrecks
Joined
·
15,343 Posts
Imported post

No he dosent



OK you have catch 22

12ltr normal (NOT dumpy) is a good start and will be suitable for twinning up to twin 12s later so will save money in the long run. 15ltr and a pony alowes you to do one hell of a lot of diving before you have to up to 12ltr twin sets.

see the problem?

I would opt for the 12 + pony rig but its a close call

ATB

Mark Chase
 

·
That's Dude with an E
Joined
·
12,959 Posts
Imported post

If you opt for the 12 get the type of valve that a manifold can be connected to later.
 

·
DUE CEO, Booking agent, Coffee maker & Dogsbody...
Joined
·
10,161 Posts
Imported post

Wouldent consider a 12L, get a 15L as you will need that extra air. No need for twins till a lot later if at all, then you still got a good size tank to use for 2nd, other dives.

Personally if a new diver wants to come out with me and only has a 12L i eather borrow them a 15L or put them of till i can get them one. Failing all that i lend them mine and i'll use their 12L.

If you are just doing lakes then a 12L may be fine, but if you are paying for and making the trip out on a charter boat you want to make the most of it.

If you are in a club what do the rest use?

Dive Safe

Paul
 

·
Street Cleansing Operative
Joined
·
4,427 Posts
Imported post

<font color='#000080'>I'd go with Paul on this one.

I bought a 15 when I first started and then soon added a second to take out for a day's hardboat diving. It gave me enough air when new until I settled back to a decent air consumption. I now have enough air to run my dives up to no-deco with a sufficient reserve, just in case. Dives of an hour plus are no problem.

Four years on and I'll be moving onto twins next year and so have fitted H-valves to my 15's so that I can easily swap and change between the two different set-ups, so keeping my 15's useful for shallow second dives or shore dives.

There is an argument for getting 12's so you can twin them up in the future. Well, I'd suggest you'd do better to get what suits your needs now and not worry about what you might want later. There is a ready market in second hand tanks - changing them should never be prohibitively expensive. And besides, you might never choose to twin up, so why do yourself short with a smaller tank now?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Imported post

Personally I would recommend the 12l 300 bar - more air than the 15l - so long as you can get 300 bar - which is becoming more popular - and not as bulky - also better when empty on the weight front
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,966 Posts
Imported post

[b said:
Quote[/b] (Shadow81 @ Nov. 23 2003,21:29)]Personally I would recommend the 12l 300 bar - more air than the 15l - so long as you can get 300 bar - which is becoming more popular - and not as bulky - also better when empty on the weight front
<font color='#0000FF'>fine idea
Shadow81
I started with 1 300BAR 12L then got a second and then 300BAR pony now i mostly use the 12s twined up.
another idea is 10L 300 BAR plenty air nice size plus option of twinning with another later
wac
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Imported post

UK diving? First cylinder? Get a 15. Ooh! Suit you sir. Worry about the technicalities later.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,966 Posts
Imported post

<font color='#0000FF'>Go 12L 300 bar lot more comftable due to smaller diameter than the 15L.
You need less lead on your belt,as the 300bar cylinder is more negativly boyant.
300bar come with din fitting as standard which is a good thing.
Less top heavy when you turn in the water.
Take some advise from somone who has used both.
If not, see if you can borrow 15L to try I know lots of pepole who have regreted buying 15L after trying my 300bar 12L

Wax
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Imported post

You say to get a 15L as your first cylinder because if you are new your air consumption is higher. This does vary from person to person though.

I have only done 15 dives so far but my SAC is about 20l/min during an easy dive looking around the stanegarth for example. During my AOW navigation dive which involved a long time sitting at 7m waiting for my time (approx a 74 min dive) my SAC was about 14l/min. I understand this is a bit less than average for inexperienced divers.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top