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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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I've not dived a great deal and have only been on one very enjoyable liveaboard in Thailand thus far.  That trip taught me one or two things about what I should consider taking with me if I am to embark on an extended (especially offshore) dive trip.

I suffered greatly with headaches in the last couple of days of the trips, as well as skinning my heels on ill-fitting fins when I did not have bootees!  Additionally I saw a couple of people with ear infections and one Japanese guy with a funny looking rash on his arm and hand because he insisted on carressing a reef.

Now, I had sod-all with me to deal with any of these things and would certainly not make the same mistake in the future.  

So what would you all put in your medical kit when going on a trip?

Answers on a postcard!
 

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Ours usually consists of something like

- Arrett (diarrhea stoppers)
- Dioralyte (rehydration powders)
- Ibuprofen (painkiller/anti-inflammatory)
- Antiseptic cream
- Anti histamine cream
- plasters
- seasickness remedy (usually ginger based herbal ones)
- Herbal sleeping tablets if a long journey is involved
- tweezers

And other odds and sods depending on location...
 

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Talisker or Bowmore - expensive as a lotion but sorts everything else
 

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Plus toothache tincture, oxygen, roll of insulating tape, rehydration stuff, dehydration stuff (Lambs).
Really depends where you are, what everyone else has got.
 

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in addition to the above:
Blistex, zovirax (for those unfortunate enough to need it), olive oil and or dilute vinegar(acetic acid) for prevention of ear infection, undiluted vinegar (or if you can get it 30% Acetic acid)in case of jellyfish/anemone/coral stings
not to mention some bandages and splints just in case.
DEET (as strong as you can get) if you're going to Scotland (f***ing evil midges!)
Chee-az
Steve
Listerine too, I can't be absolutely sure, but based on personal and subjective experience I believe even very mild gum inflammation can cause a form of tooth-squeeze pain, not very pleasant

(Edited by Steve W at 2:25 pm on Jan. 30, 2003)
 

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This is becoming a very big first-aid bag - so instead of taking vinegar, if you get stung or have ear problems get someone to pee on you!  Aiming directly down the ear maybe a problem tho.

So, when I book my livaboard I'm gonna make sure it full of a female div team.







I shouldn't really have said that should I.
 

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My god "Golden Shower Ingmire". No wonder the missus rarely lets you out!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
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Yes, perhaps the female dive team would be a bonus in the event of the peeing-ear remedy.  If the boat has videoing facilities you could ...

Enough of that methinks!

Another thing, what about something for sinus/blocked nose type of problem?  I was told about something called SUDAFED, but can't remember if it was for such a problem.  Or, for that matter, whether you can dive whilst taking it (I have a nagging thought in my mind about one commonly available medication posibly falling into this category).
 

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Cheers guys thats not really what I meant!  Ralphy was actually closer the mark.  

Lets face it if you are stung which would you rather, Hairy-arsed BSAC diver or Tanya Streeter?
 

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I always pack sudafed for dive trips,  I am not advocating the use of decongestants but I do find that it is easier to equalise if i am a little congested and I take some decongestants.  If I have a complete block (cold or flu) then forget it.

I do find they can make me feel a bit more dehydrated though so I always drink plenty of fluids.

I also take the usual dioralyte type mixes and diorhe.. diarhe.. dior..  something to stop the raging shits ;) but unless it is really bad I generally just let nature take its course and keep hydrated,  I normally find the problem goes after a couple of days and I work on the principle better out than in.  

The last red sea liveaboard I was on I think it is fair to say the toilets were always at a premium and the majority of us just legged it for the toilets after the briefing (pre kit up) and had a return visit after the dive.  Like I said couple of days and then we were mostly ok.  The 2 people who started taking dior.. diarh.. tablets for the raging squits had stomach pains and cramps most of the week.  

Other things I take,  anti inflammotories, anti histamines, sutures, small pads, sanitory towels (make excellent pads for treating wounds - very absorbent).  betanovate (apparently very good to treat mild ear infections).

A sad fact I know, but my spares and tools kit is now bigger than my first aid kit ;) Well we all have to have priorities.

Daz

(Edited by daz at 4:15 pm on Jan. 30, 2003)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
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Well, that all makes some good sense so I'll have a good basis to build on for the next one!!  

Either that, or I'll take a packof plasters and my membership card for the "Yellow Divers Club".  Better the medical pack probably though!!
 

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Some good idea above, have a swatch at these:

Bren's First Aid Kit:

* Rubber gloves - as worn in hospitals.
* Breathing mask - every Rescue Diver and above should carry one!
* Condomns - properly knotted can easily hold 2 litres of drinking water or, conversely, keep any water or dirt off kit that needs keeping clean/dry.
* Scalpel - you never know what you might need to cut through!
* If you can't get hold of proper sutures, then a normal needle and tough cotten will do for stitching up any wounds as a temporary measure before proper treatment can be sought - as long as the needle has been dipped and repeatedly flamed (with your Zippo!) in alcohol (preferably clear - e.g. Vodka, Polish, 60% or above).
* Sanitary Towels - brilliant kit!! Soaks up anything and can easily be used as a field-dressing where pressure might need to be applied to a wound for stablisation.
* A working knowledge of 02 Provision & Maintenance; Medic 1st-Aid skills upto date and the ability to deliver effective CPR.

Optional Extras:

* ****, pack, your own brand, one, for the use of.
* Hip-flask, single-malt, for the interviewing of....;)
 

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Re Bren's comment '* If you can't get hold of proper sutures, then a normal needle and tough cotten will do for stitching up any wounds as a temporary measure before proper treatment can be sought - as long as the needle has been dipped and repeatedly flamed (with your Zippo!) in alcohol (preferably clear - e.g. Vodka, Polish, 60% or above). '

Great advice the sterilising solution also doubles as an anest... anasth.  oh sod it something to numb the pain.  

Daz

(I really must find that dicti.. dictio... oh FFS)
 

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As an alternative to Sudafed try Olbas Oil, great stuff!

Very good call on the pocket mask Bren (at least that's what I took to mean by "breathing mask), there's a lively thread on the BSAC forum about potential transmission of unpleasant diseases , a pocket mask is the ideal way to help in avoiding these
AV Mouth to Nose Risk Assessment

Chee-az
Steve
 

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Also from the other side, someone reckons there's a problem with Nitrox and Sudafed, that's news to me, anyone else heard that before?
Steve
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Nitrox courses make the point that it is very unwise to use sudafed when diving on nitrox because of effects of elevated ppO2 on the effects of the drug.
OK.

I keep a few sudafed tablets in my dive kit,as do many experienced divers I know,and we all know what the book says about using decongestants and we do it anyway.For air dives,nearly all above 20m.

With the increased risk when on Nitrox I'm not willing to keep the sudafed option in my kit.

Is there an alternative?
If so what is it;if not I'd be grateful for a clear statement from a real-world knowledgable contrbutor.
Thank you.
Kevyn.
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Hi all,

Am not sure of the exact mechanism but it is the drug pseudoephedrine that has the unfortunate effect of promoting ox tox.  All you need to do is ask your pharmasist to provide you with a decongestant that doesn't contain it.  Problem is that most decongestants are moving to include pseudoephedrine.  Mucron never used to contain it (don't know what is uses now, I beleive John Gulliver is a pharmacist, maybe he can shed some light) and instead used phenylpropanolamine as its active ingredient.

HTH

Ian Daly

(Edited by Ian Daly at 6:49 pm on Jan. 30, 2003)
 

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instead of sutures, use super glue, it means you do not have to duck punches, and works just fine, in fact i was told it was invented for this use, im not sure if this is true.

Peroxide, its good for killing anything that is trying to live in your body, it hurts but it works.

Your own syringe is also a good idea if you are going to a country that is a bit disorganised.
 

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darthmoll said:
instead of sutures, use super glue, it means you do not have to duck punches, and works just fine, in fact i was told it was invented for this use, im not sure if this is true.
True, it was invented by the US military for immediate triage/treatment on the battlefield for wounds which needed closing where to stitch uo would take too long and/or where the medic/corpsman might get shot/injured if lingering over a patient.
 

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My chemist [a diver] said that sinutab is better than sudafed to use when diving don't ask me why as the explanation made me wigg out :confused:

Also keep swim ear in my box and a foil blanket.

Safe diving,
Steve

P.S. don't forget the obligatory triangular bandage every kit has one circa 1960 ;)
 
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