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One Team One Dream
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a BT Home hub and from the recent emails received from BT either they are trying to blag me into upgrading or somebody has hacked into our wireless router.

Our Download allowance is 10Gb/month
Now Neither me or the daughter are into downloading films so I would have thought that the allowance was good enough, but it seems that within 2 weeks of each month we have used 7Gb of our 10Gb.

Is there anyway I can check to see who or which devices are connected to our router.

Thanks

AG
 

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Platinum Member - I wish...
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776 Posts
Logon to BT Home hub, 192.168.1.254 for most BT routers I think.

Then you can view devices connected and you should also be able to enable logging.

Best security way of doing it though is a password and MAC address filtering.

Oh no, 7gb you say! I have only done a measley 134gb this month and counting :D

Install a freeware program called "NetMeter" on your computers and it will give you totals of upload and download usage. Add the totals from all devices and you will have an ISP independant figure.


And sorry for the rather disjointed way in which I have portrayed this info :embarassed:
 

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Sorry for being a dick
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If you think someone might be using your Wi-Fi then best to to change your Wi-Fi password now. I've been playing around with hacking Wi-Fi passwords recently and can offer this advice;

Avoid WEP if possible and use WPA or WPA2 instead (You can brute-force hack WEP networks)
MAC address filtering does not do much, easy to spoof.
Hiding the SSID does not do much and you can still find networks.
If you are using WPA/WPA2 then try to use a password that kind of randon and not based on words (You can perform a dictionary attack against WPA easily).
 

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Devout Sceptic
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Another useful tool is switching the router off when not needed.

That's bomb proof!!

I can tell when the boy is gaming or downloading in his bedroom because I notice the reduction in web access speed on my lappy. As others have said you can easily check what devices are logged on to your router and you can kick them off.
 
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I want it all....
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Also, change the router name from, eg "Netgear DG34" to "Gazza's whing ding interweb point" or suchlike so that if there is a vulnerability out there, it's not easy to identify that your router is affected.
 

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Registered
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Change the default SSID to something like "My router" - or anything except standard.

Make sure its using WPA/WPA2 and so on and NOT WEP for the encryption mode. Pick a difficult password involving upper and lower case letters, numbers and punctuation and make it fairly long.

A non-standard SSID (network name) combined with a decent strength password is more than adequate with WPA2 for home security.
WEP on the other hand can be cracked in 3-4 minutes regardless of the password so in short don't use it. Ever.

Don't bother with MAC address filtering - if someone has the ability to crack your router passwords its a trivial 3 second job to bypass MAC filtering.

As for seeing who is using it, most routers will have a list of MAC addresses and IP addresses currently connected to the network - look at that list to see if there are any "odd" ones that dont belong to the equipment you're using.

Also, maybe its not the wireless - make sure all computers are fully virus and trojan checked. Make sure there is no P2P software like bit torrent derivatives running as these will use bandwidth even when left idling when sharing. Install "net meter" or similar onto each computer and monitor its usage to make sure the figures are sane and one isn't using loads.
 

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Doing it wrong since '94
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Also make sure your ISP has got it right - it has been known for their traffic stats to be wrong :)


Sent from my iPhone using Taptotalkshite ;)
 

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It's colder than a penguin's bollocks
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I dont have a BT hub, but i assign static IP's to all my devices, then i reduce the IP range to the number of static IP's. Turn off DHCP so that no other devices can get an IP assigned by DHCP.
So if i have 10 static IP address, my IP range is set to 192.168.1.11. (192.168.1.1 is the router)
Default password changed
logging is enabled
WPA-PSK (TKIP) + WPA2-PSK (AES) - WPA2 isn't compatible with some older network cards
Disable SSID broadcast - You dont need this feature at home once your network is setup.

A note on WPA-PSK - Pre Shared Key
Shared-key WPA is vulnerable to password cracking attacks if users use a weak passphrase. As JB2cool said, to try and avoid a brute force attack, a random passphrase of 13 characters (selected from the set of 95 permitted characters) is probably sufficient.
Also make your SSID a random name , the longer the better.

Netmeter will only log the traffic through the machine it's installed on, if someone else is on your network it wont log that traffic.
 

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Registered
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I have a BT Home hub and from the recent emails received from BT either they are trying to blag me into upgrading or somebody has hacked into our wireless router.

Our Download allowance is 10Gb/month
Now Neither me or the daughter are into downloading films so I would have thought that the allowance was good enough, but it seems that within 2 weeks of each month we have used 7Gb of our 10Gb.

Is there anyway I can check to see who or which devices are connected to our router.

Thanks

AG
I had had a similar experiance, turns out Debbie was using apps (cafe world, farm world, bingo, poker etc) on facebook. Removed the apps and the usage went from 22gb per month to well below my 10gb allowance. I checked my downloads by logging into My BT.
Might be worth checking.

Graham.
 

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Sorry for being a dick
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Also, you DO realise that things like iPlayer YouTube and other streaming video can eat up lots of allowance don't you?

I have to ask as my dad had been using iPlayer lots but wondered why he'd gone over quota as he'd not "downloaded" anything.
 

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Life is a journey not a destination ...
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Apologies for adding to an old thread, but some serious issues need to be mentioned.

I agree with most of what has been said but would like to add a few bits and pieces.

WiFi or any wireless technology is in my opinion as serious a threat to security as a Virus or Spyware was five years ago. Everyone now knows they should have some protection on their computer even if they do not do it. Rather like reading the health warning and then having a cigarette!

Unfortunatley people / 'the layman' do not understand wireless technology even within companies where the engineers should know better. The number of companies I have visited and disconnected the WiFi from the corporate LAN is worrying. People buy a wireless router or gateway, plug it in and off they go. Even worse it is provided by their ISP with poor security settings and the user does not understand enough to make the change.

Correctly used WiFi is great and I do use it myself within my home and business. Please don't take this as a knock of WiFi, I have worked on a couple of WiFi based products in past lives and do appreicate the benefits it gives.

Ok, what I should have said pre rant...

1. By default on Home grade WiFi routers, the WiFi is connected to the GREEN side of the firewall and is the same as a connection to any of the LAN sockets on the back of your router. This means that when someone has connected to your WiFi they have connected to your home LAN. Consider how much protection you would put on a piece of Ethernet cable that connected the back of your router to a point just outside your garden gate.....

2. WiFi signals go a long way. I have shown a client how the signal strength and quality in their carpark (they are on the top floor of a 4 story office block) is the same as it is just outside their office door. This means Jonny Hacker can sit in the carpark with his laptop and work on hacking your network. The same will apply to your house. Do a scan with your laptop and see how many of your neighbours have WiFi.

3. Decide why you want WiFi in your home. if its just to allow your Wireless devices; Games machines, TV, Smartphone etc access to the Internet then setup the WiFi as such and don't give the WiFi access to your home LAN. This might mean buying a new firewall router to separate the WiFi from the home LAN. If you really need WiFi to be connected to your home LAN then please be aware of the security implications.

4. Set the level of protection on your WiFi as high as the connected devices will allow. If this is not at least WPA-PSK then seriously consider junking the device as it is reducing your protection level. If your router or device only supports WEP then use it but save / plan an upgrade ASAP. This is not secure and can be hacked with software on from the web in 20seconds! Ideally you want WPA2-PSK on everything, but we are not in an ideal world.

5. Please do not consider the statement 'why would the hacker target me' as valid. The hacker may be interested in what is on your PC but more likely he will be interested in taking over your PC and using it for his own purposes.

6. A great phrase which used to bore me but is actually so true is "Security is a journey and not a destination". Considering how we all install our AV package and pay each year for the updates and regularly install all the necessary Windows or other updates (you shoudl be saying yes to all the above or at least nodding along) and then we go out and get our WiFi router, set up the security and forget about it till it stops working. Maybe best to set a note in our calendar to review the security every six months or less if you have the time and see how secure WPA2-PSK is now. At the very least do a google search or talk to more knowlegeable friends every time you renew your AV subscription.

Sorry for the long message but I feel passionate about this and its so easy to get it wrong and let the bad guys in.

Hope this helps.

Gary
 

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Partly Worn
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I'm not convinced any of my neighbours knows how to hack my wireless as most still have default SSID - all sounds a bit millennium bug to me.
 

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Manta stalker
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I had a BT home hub a few years ago and had an allowance of 10gb, which I never, ever touched. One day I also got the email from BT re using up my allowance.

Cue endless searches on google re finding out about how to check my usage, security and how to check what was using my signal. I used only WEP and found to my cost that some cheeky [email protected] was on my network!! My reaction was to turn the router off immediately.

It stayed off until I learnt some more, like for example that the home hub I had and the software at that point only supported WEP! using the computer at work. I also learnt that I was better off hard wiring the system until I could get a better router.

I changed router and never received the same email again, I also made sure I had the highest security available, WPA2-TSK or something. I also often check what is connected to my network. I have been known to kick off my own devices where I don't recognise the name, my work laptop being one of them!

My biggest concern was that they may be downloading kiddie porn or something and I would get a knock on the door - how would I prove it wasn't me??
 

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Life is a journey not a destination ...
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Don,

Each situation is different. Most people will not know how to do it; but as their kids get older and more skilled (at a frightening rate) then look-out.

My main concern is not actually yoru neighbours but the man in a van who parks in your street.

Stay safe.

Gary
 

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Sorry for being a dick
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1,757 Posts
My biggest concern was that they may be downloading kiddie porn or something and I would get a knock on the door - how would I prove it wasn't me??
You don't have to. The court would have to prove that it was you. If you pleaded this argument then you may well get away with all sorts.
 

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Registered
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I'm with Golddigger on setting up static IP's and shutting down DHCP. Do you really need wireless? If the cabling is an issue try Powerline adaptors.

While we're on it. To access the "Advanced settings" in a BT Router the default username is "admin" and so is the password. On a Sky router (Netgear i think) it's "admin" and password is "sky". Why this isn't printed on the box or manual I'll never know.
 

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Weasily recognised or stoatily different?
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Also if you go static ip change it from the default ip range. Choose something like e.g. 192.168.53 rather than the default. Virtually all routers default to either 192.168.1.1 or 192.168.0.1. Choosing something different just adds another fence that needs jumping over.

Sent from my GT-I9000 using Tapatalk
 
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