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COULD ANYONE HELP ME TO DECIDE IF ANY OR ALL THE FOLLOWING WRECKS ARE WORTH A DIVE. IF SO COULD YOU ADVISE ME OF ANY TIPS IE WHEN TO DIVE, ANYTHING TO WATCH OUT FOR ECT.
1 THE ROYAL CHARTER
2  DAKOTA
3  ALARM LIGHTSHIP
4  CADMUS IN THE BRIDLINGTON AREA
THANKS FOR ANY ADVISE AS THIS IS THE FIRST TIME I HAVE EVER USED A FORUM.
IAN GILL
 

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Hey Ian,

Welcome to YD mate. We'll be able to give you a heads-up on most of these wrecks as we'll be diving them this weekend.

Any one else for the Cadmus??
 

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<font color='#000080'>Welcome to the boards Ian,

You might have to wait a few days for an answer,  but I am sure you will get the info you require.

Daz
 

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I have several GPS for the Cadmus, namely 53 51 32N 00 12 54E, 53 50 954N 00 12 404E and 53 50 950N 00 12 360E. Supposedly at 25m.A good site is www.britishdiver.com and it has the Cadmus as being a steamer sunk in 1917 by a torpedo. Apparently it was carrying ammo and you are limited to 2 shells per diver!
The only Royal Charter I know is out of Moelfre on Anglesey.
I haven't dived either of them but RC should be at 53 22 17N 04 15 20W between 5 to 20 m and built in 1859.
Apart from that, b*gger all
Good hunting
Roy
 

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Charter Boat Skipper, Salvage Diver & YBOD abuser
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<font color='#000080'>Hi Ian,
 See my web site:
 ( messed up hyperlink- site is on my profile)
for a bit on the Dakota.
Royal Charter is smashed to bits and mainly buried in sand, Max Depth 8M or so, I've had none myself but there is still gold to be found! The wreck is easy to find GPS not Req....
there is a monument on top of the cliffs around 1 mile West of Moelfre Island and the wreck is directly below this - main section ,ribs etc to west in a gully in rocks.
Hope this helps,
                      Terry
Lat long I have for ALARM: N53.31.35 W 03.30.83- not dived myself but reported as Sea-bed 29M top of wreck 23MDAKOTAdakotamysite
 

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Respected Wreck-diving Author & Resident Farnes Ex
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Hi Ian

CADMUS, Depth 25m, lowest astronomical depth.
Reference: N53 50 950 E000 12 344
Location: 18.97-miles SSE from Flamborough Head & 9.32-miles NE from Withernsea.

At 8.40 p.m. on 18th October 1917, the CADMUS was torpedoed and sunk by the German Imperial U-boat SM UC 47. Under the command of Captain M. Morilla, the SS CADMUS was on passage from Dunkirk for Blyth after picking up a valuable 900-ton cargo of empty brass shell cases for recycling from the Western Front. Before firing the torpedo, the U-boat had shadowed the steamer for some time and on a parallel course without navigation lights. Some of the crew actually saw the wake of the approaching missile. However, there was insufficient time to take evasive action, before it detonated in the No-2 hold. The explosion caused such a massive hole below the waterline that the steamship immediately settled to port and started to sink. Her crew of twenty-two abandoned ship in the two boats at once and sat watching their vessel go down, just ten minutes following the explosion. The enemy-raider surfaced and stayed in the vicinity for further twenty-five minutes, but made no further effort to bother the survivors. Luckily weather conditions were reasonable and the crew in the master’s boat were picked up off Spurn and landed at Immingham. The other boat carrying the mate was picked up by a patrol-boat and landed at Grimsby.
The SS CADMUS was insured under the Government’s war risk scheme and Christian Salvesen received £93,000 for her, making a profit of £48,495 from her loss.
(SM UC 47 was later rammed and sunk off Flamborough Head on 18th November 1917.)
Wreck-site
The wreck lies orientated in a NE to SW direction, on a seabed of fine sand, small black shells and stones, in a general depth of 25m, being the lowest astronomical depth. She has been commercially salvaged in recent times, but much of her cargo, which includes boxes of live shells and empty 8.16-kilos (18-pound) shells are still scattered around. Locally she is now referred to as ‘the shell-case-supermarket’, but local divers ration themselves to two shells per person. There was so much of the cargo left, that at one time, the authorities considered declaring her a prohibited site to sport-divers. Large amounts of the wreck are now partially buried and the upper structures are collapsed and broken. She is lying in two halves near the boiler and engines and large loose coils of steel-wire, empty shell cases and other debris lie between the two major sections. A spare propeller lies aft of the boiler. The hold still contains many complete boxes of shell cases in good condition and only recently the ship’s compass was recovered among the shell cases.

Cheers Ron
Hope that helps
 

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Skimped on the old info a bit there, didn't we Ron??  
 

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Ron

Top info, my taste buds have been well tickled by that and i may have to sort out a trip to have a look at that one.

Cheers mate

Paul
 
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